STEM education

Dear Colleague Letter: STEM Education for the Future

Wednesday, June 20, 2018

Read DCL NSF 18-084 Online

Dear Colleagues:

NSF invites proposals to solve educational challenges created by the technology revolution. To effectively respond to many of the problems facing our nation, new scientific advances are needed, as defined in the Big Ideas for Future NSF Investments. Achieving these advances will require changes in what people learn and how they learn it. Through this STEM Education for the Future Dear Colleague Letter (DCL), existing NSF education and workforce development programs encourage innovative proposals to prepare scientists and engineers for work in new contexts created by technology and big data.

Specifically, through this DCL, NSF aims to support STEM educational research and development projects whose results can enable our country to: better prepare its scientific and technical workforce for the future; use technological innovations effectively for education; advance the frontiers of science; and adapt to both new work environments and new education pathways needed to prepare students at all levels for those environments.

Technology, Computation, and Big Data are driving changes to daily life. Computing, sensing, data storage, data access, communication, and hardware technologies continue to change our lives and work. These technologies produce unprecedented volumes of data and vast interconnectivity capabilities, such as data provided by ubiquitous sensing and the Internet of Things. Personal, behavioral, transactional, and environmental data in a myriad of formats (numerical, image, audio, and others) are available at ever greater speeds, propelling innovations such as artificial intelligence-aided automation. Such automation in the home, office, and classroom also challenges long-standing expectations about privacy, security, and the veracity of the underlying data

Although it is expected that technology, computation, and big data will have positive impacts on the human condition, the world still faces persistent societal, cultural, and economic challenges, e.g., hunger, poverty, our dynamic Earth, and energy security. Moreover, we must continue work to ensure equitable access to precisely those technologies that give rise to these changes. Equally important is the challenge of ensuring equitable access to high quality education, which leads directly to questions important to the NSF: How do these new technologies change the way we learn and do science, math, and engineering? How do we navigate such change? How do we use technological innovations to ensure full participation of all groups in the STEM workforce?

To answer these questions related to learning, researchers will need to cross disciplines, define the potential impact of technologies, and develop new technical competencies. Furthermore, all scientific and technical workers will need new knowledge and skills so they can perform new tasks or perform current tasks with new tools.

This DCL seeks proposals related to harnessing the data revolution and the future of work at the human-technology frontier. This DCL encourages educational research and development proposals that are original, creative, and transformative, and that can help the nation educate the STEM workforce of the future, in contexts of:

All proposals responding to this DCL should address education issues related to FW-HTF, HDR, or to both. Proposals can also include activities that are relevant to other NSF Big Ideas.

This DCL will support three categories of proposals:

  1. Proposals focused on educational transformation: These proposals will leverage technology, computation and/or big data to develop, implement, and analyze educational interventions designed to prepare a diverse workforce, researchers, and innovators of the future. Proposals that explore how students learn to integrate knowledge across disciplines to solve complex problems fall into this category.
  2. Proposals focused on the science of teaching and learning: These proposals will leverage technology, computation and/or big data to develop, implement, and analyze new tools for assessing and evaluating convergent education strategies that aim to promote student learning at all levels.
  3. Planning grants, Research Coordination Networks, Conference Proposals: These proposals will create communities of STEM educators to address convergent curriculum and pedagogical challenges across disciplinary boundaries brought about by the human-technology frontier, the data revolution, or both.

This DCL emphasizes proposals that cross departmental and disciplinary boundaries. This DCL encourages original proposals for curricular innovations that cross boundaries, so that students gain the tools and knowledge needed to thrive in the technology revolution and become the creators/innovators of the future.

This DCL encourages proposals that reflect a coordinated effort from interdisciplinary research teams of at least two PIs from different disciplines. Such teams can make learning a convergence experience and accomplish learning goals that are not otherwise achievable. Examples include, but are not limited to: computational skills in an application area such as genetics; automation and sensing in natural and manufactured environments; calculus, modeling and simulation of physical contexts and objects; art, psychology, conceptual design and mechanical design for better product development; or sociology and earth sciences to address adaptation to our environment. Proposals that use convergence approaches to instill the development of needed non-technical abilities for the 21st century are also appropriate, including ones that focus on development of teamwork, higher level thinking, problem solving, creativity, adaptability, and the ability to communicate across disciplinary boundaries.

In summary, competitive proposals will propose an approach that reflects convergence in education and human resource development, using technology and data beyond disciplinary boundaries to create student outcomes that will benefit society.

Responding to the STEM Education for the Future DCL
Proposals responding to this DCL should be submitted by the due date of the applicable funding opportunities listed below.

To determine whether a research topic is within the scope of this DCL, principal investigators are strongly encouraged to contact the cognizant NSF Program Officer(s) of the participating program(s) to which they plan to submit their proposal. These programs include:

Program Program Link and
Solicitation
Due dates
EHR Accelerating Discovery:
Educating the Future STEM
Workforce (AD)
AD (PD 18-1998) April 2, 2018 - January 16, 2019
DUE Improving Undergraduate
STEM Education: Education and
Human Resources [i]
IUSE: EHR (NSF 17-590) Accepted anytime (Exploration and
Development Tier) Dec 11, 2018 (Development and
Implementation Tier)
DUE Advanced Technological
Education [ii]
ATE (NSF 17-568) October 4, 2018
DGE Innovations in Graduate
Education [iii]
IGE (NSF 17-585) September 27, 2018
HRD Historically Black Colleges
and Universities -
Undergraduate Program [iv]
HBCU-UP (NSF 18-522) See solicitation
HRD Tribal Colleges and
Universities Program [v]
TCUP (NSF 16-531) See solicitation
HRD/DUE Improving Undergraduate
STEM Education: Hispanic-
Serving Institutions (HSI Program) [vi]
HSI See program page
DRL Innovative Technology
Experiences for Students and
Teachers [vii]
ITEST (NSF 17-565)

 

August 8, 2018
DRL Advancing Informal STEM
Learning[viii]
AISL (NSF 17-573) November 7, 2018
BIO/EHR Research Coordination
Networks in Undergraduate
Biology Education [ix]
RCN-UBE (NSF 18-510) January 22, 2019
EEC Research in the Formation
of Engineers[x]
RFE (NSF 17-514) February 28, 2019
GEO Ocean Education Program [xi] OCE Contact Elizabeth Rom,
jmeriwet [at] nsf [dot] gov
GEO Polar Special Initiatives
Program [xii]

OPP

Contact Elizabeth Rom,
jmeriwet [at] nsf [dot] gov

To ensure proper consideration, principal investigators must indicate the relevant Big Idea(s) in the title, the overview statement of the Project Summary, and the Project Description. For example, the title of a proposal about the Future of Work at the Human Technology Frontier and Rules of Life should begin with "FW-HTF/RoL" and a proposal addressing educational challenges relevant to Harnessing the Data Revolution should precede its title with "HDR." Table 1 lists the NSF Big Ideas and designated acronyms. In summary, proposals responding to this DCL:

  1. Should focus on education and/or workforce development in the context of the Future of Work at the Human-Technology Frontier, Harnessing the Data Revolution, or both.
  2. May intersect with additional Big Ideas for Future NSF Investment.
  3. Should include PIs from different disciplines.
  4. Must be submitted to one of the programs listed in this DCL.
  5. Must comply with the relevant program/solicitation-specific requirements.
  6. Must present novel ideas or approaches (high risk/high reward proposals are encouraged).
  7. Must have titles that adhere to the naming convention noted above.

 

Table 1. NSF's Six Research Big Ideas for Future NSF Investment

The Future of Work at the Human-Technology Frontier FW-HTF
Harnessing the Data Revolution HDR
Understanding the Rules of Life: Predicting Phenotype RoL
Navigating the New Arctic NNA
Windows on the Universe: The Era of Multi-Messenger Astrophysics MMA
The Quantum Leap: Leading the Next Quantum Revolution QL

Sincerely,

William (Jim) Lewis
Assistant Director (Acting)
Directorate for Education & Human Resources

Joanne S. Tornow
Assistant Director (Acting)
Directorate for Biological Sciences

Dawn M. Tilbury
Assistant Director
Directorate for Engineering

William E. Easterling
Assistant Director
Directorate for Geosciences

___________________________________________

 

[i]The IUSE: EHR program supports projects that have the potential to improve student learning in STEM through development of new curricular materials and methods of instruction, and development of new assessment tools to measure student learning in science and engineering classrooms.

[ii]The Advanced Technological Education (ATE) program focuses on the education of technicians for the high-technology fields that drive our nation's economy. The program involves partnerships between academic institutions and industry to promote improvement in the education of science and engineering technicians at the undergraduate and secondary school levels. The ATE program supports curriculum development; professional development of college faculty and secondary school teachers; career pathways; and other activities.

[iii]The IGE program is designed to encourage the development and implementation of bold, new, and potentially transformative approaches to STEM graduate education and training. IGE projects pilot, test, and validate novel approaches and generate the knowledge required to add to our understanding of graduate student learning, thereby allowing others to adapt/adopt successful, evidence-based approaches.

[iv]HBCU-UP is committed to enhancing the quality of undergraduate STEM education and research at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) as a means to broaden participation in the nation's STEM workforce. The HRD HBCU-UP tracks realize this purpose by providing awards to develop, implement, and study innovative approaches for making dramatic improvements in the preparation and success of HBCU undergraduate students so that they may participate successfully in graduate programs and/or careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines.

[v]The Tribal Colleges and Universities Program (TCUP) provides awards to Tribal Colleges and Universities, Alaska Native-serving institutions, and Native Hawaiian-serving institutions to promote high quality science (including sociology, psychology, anthropology, economics, statistics, and other social and behavioral sciences as well as natural sciences and education disciplines), technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education, research, and outreach. Support is available to TCUP-eligible institutions.

[vi]The HSI Program seeks to enhance the quality of undergraduate STEM education at HSIs and to increase retention and graduation rates of undergraduate students pursuing degrees in STEM fields at HSIs. In addition, the HSI Program seeks to build capacity at HSIs that typically do not receive high levels of NSF grant funding.

[vii]ITEST is a research and development program that supports projects to promote PreK-12 student interests and capacities to participate in the STEM and information and communications technology (ICT) workforce of the future

[vii]The AISL program seeks to advance new approaches to and evidence-based understanding of the design and development of STEM learning opportunities for the public in informal environments; provide multiple pathways for broadening access to and engagement in STEM learning experiences; advance innovative research on and assessment of STEM learning in informal environments; and engage the public of all ages in learning STEM in informal environments.

[ix]The goal of the RCN program is to advance a field or create new directions in research or education by supporting groups of investigators to communicate and coordinate their research, training, and educational activities across disciplinary, organizational, geographic, and international boundaries. The RCN-UBE program originated as a unique RCN track to "catalyze positive changes in biology undergraduate education" (NSF 08-035) and is now supported by the collaborative efforts of the Directorate for Biological Sciences (BIO) and the Directorate for Education and Human Resources (EHR). It has been responsive to the national movement to revolutionize undergraduate learning and teaching in the biological sciences. RCN-UBE accepts workshop proposals, incubator proposals, and full RCN proposals in undergraduate biology education.

[x]The RFE program advances research about the underlying processes and mechanisms involved in the formation of engineers by deepening our fundamental understanding of how professional formation is or can be accomplished.

[xi]The OCE Education program supports efforts to integrate ocean research and education. In particular, the program is interested in receiving proposals related to the Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI).

[xii]Polar Special Initiatives Program welcomes proposals related to the training of students with "Big Data" tools focusing on polar regions' satellite imagery, digital elevation maps, "3D virtual" ice sheets dynamics and/or proposals related to Navigating the New Arctic.

Dear Colleague Letter: Research on Methodologies for STEM Education

Monday, September 25, 2017

NSF 17-136

September 19, 2017

Dear Colleagues:

The EHR Core Research (ECR) program of the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Directorate for Education and Human Resources (EHR) wishes to notify the community of the intention to support fundamental research on methodologies that support valid inferences in STEM education. This Dear Colleague Letter (DCL) calls for research proposals to be submitted to the ECR program (NSF 15-509) that will develop and rigorously test new methodologies and grow the community's collective capacity to conduct rigorous research and evaluation on STEM learning and learning environments, workforce development, and broadening participation.

With this DCL, ECR invites proposals on the development, application, and extension of formal models and methodologies for STEM education research and evaluation, including methods for improving statistical modeling, qualitative modeling, measurement, replication, and learning analytics. This includes research on methodological aspects of new or existing procedures for data collection, curation, and inference in STEM education. Similarly, ECR seeks proposals related to collection of unique databases with cross-boundary value, particularly when paired with innovative developments in measurement or methodology (standard statistical modeling, qualitative research, measurement, replication and learning analytics). Proposers must demonstrate how advances in the methodology will support important theoretical insights in STEM education research or evaluation. Proposers are encouraged to explore a wide range of fundamental research projects (in the areas of quantitative, qualitative, measurement, replication, and learning analytics methodologies) that may address, but are not limited to, such topics as:

  • Methodologies to study developmental trajectories of student learning of STEM content;
  • Models and methodologies that increase external validity of STEM research results;
  • Advances in research on evaluation in STEM education;
  • Mediation and moderation analysis as they play out in clustered field settings to support STEM learning;
  • Advances in quantitative research involving growth and interruptions to that growth (e.g., repeated measures designs);
  • Advances in metasynthesis of qualitative research in STEM education;
  • Advances in linguistic analysis applied to STEM education;
  • Advances in construct validity;
  • Advances in network analysis for use in STEM education;
  • Advances in item level factor analysis;
  • Development of models and methodologies to improve and build replication in STEM education research;
  • Advances in the measurement of STEM human and social capital;
  • Advances in methodologies to automate and validate the coding of video data in STEM settings;
  • Advances in Bayesian or computational modeling of STEM education data;
  • Advances in the application of machine learning approaches to STEM education;
  • Improving methods for data sharing for STEM education research;
  • Advances in scientometrics and citation analysis in relation to STEM education research;
  • Improvements in the study of the diffusion of innovation in STEM education.

As described in the ECR program announcement, three levels of funding are available and should align with the maturity of the proposed work, the size and scope of the empirical effort, as well as the capacity of the research team to conduct the proposed research: (1) Level I proposals have a maximum award size of $500,000 and a maximum duration of 3 years; (2) Level II proposals have a maximum total award size of $1,500,000 and a maximum duration of 3 years; (3) Level III proposals have a maximum award size of $2,500,000 and a maximum duration of 5 years. Most, if not all, awards will be funded as Level I studies.

In addition, NSF is interested in supporting capacity building proposals through synthesis projects, conference proposals, and Early Concept Grants for Exploratory Research (EAGER) proposals.

Synthesis proposals seek support for synthesis of methodological knowledge on a topic of critical importance to STEM learning and for the diffusion of research-based knowledge to the STEM research community. An example of a synthesis project in this area could include the clarification of the status of research relative to growth modeling and how these models are taken up in STEM learning research with a specific emphasis on directions for new research (i.e., unanswered methodological questions and how answers to these questions would support the evidentiary warrants of STEM education research). Maximum award size for Synthesis proposals is $300,000 for a duration of up to two years.

Conference proposals seek support to conduct highly-focused conferences (or workshops) related to the research goals of the ECR program. Investigators are encouraged to propose workshops as one way to diffuse the research-based knowledge (perhaps developed through a synthesis award). The involvement of, and dissemination to, STEM education researchers is an important aspect of this work. Information about the preparing Conference Proposals is contained in the PAPPG Chapter II.E.7.

The EAGER funding mechanism may be used to support exploratory work in its early stages on untested, but potentially transformative, research ideas or approaches. This work may be considered especially "high risk-high payoff" in the sense that it, for example, involves radically different approaches, applies new expertise, or engages novel disciplinary or interdisciplinary perspectives. Potential investigators must contact an NSF program officer whose expertise is most germane to the proposal topic prior to submission of an EAGER proposal. Requests may be for up to $300,000 and of up to two years duration. Information about the preparing EAGER Proposals is contained in the PAPPG Chapter II.E.2.

The annual deadline for submission of proposals to ECR is the second Thursday in September. Conference and EAGER proposals may be submitted throughout the year. The NSF also strongly encourages early career faculty to submit proposals.

Principal investigators interested in submitting proposals (or with other questions pertaining to this DCL) may contact one of the program directors:

Finbarr Sloane, fsloane [at] nsf [dot] gov
Program Director, EHR/DRL
ECR program, ECR [at] nsf [dot] gov

Discovery Research PreK-12

Monday, July 31, 2017

Program Solicitation

NSF 17-584

Replaces Document(s):
NSF 15-592

NSF Logo  

National Science Foundation

Directorate for Education & Human Resources
     Research on Learning in Formal and Informal Settings

Full Proposal Deadline(s) (due by 5 p.m. submitter's local time):

November 14, 2017

November 14, 2018

Second Wednesday in November, Annually Thereafter

SUMMARY OF PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

General Information

Program Title:

Discovery Research PreK-12 (DRK-12)

Synopsis of Program:

The Discovery Research PreK-12 program (DRK-12) seeks to significantly enhance the learning and teaching of science, technology, engineering, mathematics and computer science (STEM) by preK-12 students and teachers, through research and development of STEM education innovations and approaches. Projects in the DRK-12 program build on fundamental research in STEM education and prior research and development efforts that provide theoretical and empirical justification for proposed projects. Projects should result in research-informed and field-tested outcomes and products that inform teaching and learning. Teachers and students who participate in DRK-12 studies are expected to enhance their understanding and use of STEM content, practices and skills.

The DRK-12 program invites proposals that address immediate challenges that are facing preK-12 STEM education as well as those that anticipate radically different structures and functions of preK-12 teaching and learning. The DRK-12 program has three major research and development strands: (1) Assessment; (2) Learning; and (3) Teaching. The program recognizes the synergy among the three strands and that there is some overlap and interdependence among them. However, proposals should identify a clear focus of the proposed research efforts (i.e., assessment, learning, or teaching) consistent with the proposal's main objectives and research questions. The program supports five types of projects: (1) Exploratory, (2) Design and Development, (3) Impact, (4) Implementation and Improvement, and (5) Conferences and Syntheses. All five types of projects apply to each of the three DRK-12 program strands.

Cognizant Program Officer(s):

Please note that the following information is current at the time of publishing. See program website for any updates to the points of contact.

  • Inquiries can be made to, telephone: (703) 292-8620, email: DRLDRK12 [at] nsf [dot] gov
  • David B. Campbell, telephone: (703) 292-5093, email: dcampbel [at] nsf [dot] gov
  • Julia V. Clark, telephone: (703) 292-5119, email: jclark [at] nsf [dot] gov
  • Catherine Eberbach, telephone: (703) 292-4960, email: ceberbac [at] nsf [dot] gov
  • Michael Ford, telephone: (703) 292-5153, email: miford [at] nsf [dot] gov
  • David L. Haury, telephone: (703) 292-8614, email: dhaury [at] nsf [dot] gov
  • Margret Hjalmarson, telephone: (703) 292-4313, email: mhjalmar [at] nsf [dot] gov
  • Karen King, telephone: (703) 292-5124, email: kking [at] nsf [dot] gov
  • Rebecca Kruse, telephone: (703) 292-4211, email: rkruse [at] nsf [dot] gov
  • Julio E. Lopez-Ferrao, telephone: (703) 292-5183, email: jlopezfe [at] nsf [dot] gov
  • Robert Ochsendorf, telephone: (703) 292-2760, email: rochsend [at] nsf [dot] gov
  • Joseph Reed, telephone: (703) 292-5187, email: jreed [at] nsf [dot] gov
  • Ferdinand D. Rivera, telephone: (703) 292-8620, email: frivera [at] nsf [dot] gov
  • Robert Ronau, telephone: (703) 292-5089, email: rronau [at] nsf [dot] gov
  • Monya A. Ruffin, telephone: (703) 292-4635, email: mruffin [at] nsf [dot] gov
  • Robert Russell, telephone: (703) 292-2995, email: rlrussel [at] nsf [dot] gov
  • Joan M. Walker, telephone: (703) 292-7016, email: jowalker [at] nsf [dot] gov

Applicable Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) Number(s):

  • 47.076 --- Education and Human Resources

Award Information

Anticipated Type of Award:

Standard Grant or Continuing Grant

Estimated Number of Awards: 20 to 31

It is anticipated that about 8-13 Level I awards, 5-8 Level II awards, 1-4 Level III awards, and 5 Conference/Synthesis awards will be made in FY 2018, pending availability of funds. One Resource Center with a budget of up to $3,500,000 will be supported for a duration of 3 years in the 2018 fiscal year.

Anticipated Funding Amount: $57,000,000

Pending availability of funds, NSF anticipates approximately $57,000,000 will be available for the FY2018 competition.

Normal limits for funding requests of DRK -12 proposals are as follows: (1) Level I projects up to $450,000 with duration up to three years; (2) Level II projects up to $3,000,000 with duration up to four years; and (3) Level III projects up to $5,000,000 with duration up to five years. Synthesis proposals are up to $300,000 and two years duration. Conference proposals are up to $100,000 and one year duration. The level of funding for the proposal should align with the maturity of the proposed work, the size and scope of the empirical effort, as well as the capacity of the interdisciplinary team to conduct the proposed research.

Eligibility Information

Who May Submit Proposals:

The categories of proposers eligible to submit proposals to the National Science Foundation are identified in the NSF Proposal & Award Policies & Procedures Guide (PAPPG), Chapter I.E.

Who May Serve as PI:

There are no restrictions or limits.

Limit on Number of Proposals per Organization:

There are no restrictions or limits.

Limit on Number of Proposals per PI or Co-PI:

There are no restrictions or limits.

Proposal Preparation and Submission Instructions

A. Proposal Preparation Instructions

  • Letters of Intent: Not required
  • Preliminary Proposal Submission: Not required
  • Full Proposals:

B. Budgetary Information

  • Cost Sharing Requirements:

    Inclusion of voluntary committed cost sharing is prohibited.

  • Indirect Cost (F&A) Limitations:

    Not Applicable

  • Other Budgetary Limitations:

    Other budgetary limitations apply. Please see the full text of this solicitation for further information.

C. Due Dates

  • Full Proposal Deadline(s) (due by 5 p.m. submitter's local time):

    November 14, 2017

    November 14, 2018

    Second Wednesday in November, Annually Thereafter

STEM + Computing Partnerships (STEM+C)

Friday, January 6, 2017

Program Solicitation

NSF 17-535

Full Proposal Deadline(s) (due by 5 p.m. submitter's local time):  March 29, 2017

Synopsis of Program

As computing has become an integral part of the practice of modern science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), the STEM + Computing Partnerships program seeks to address the urgent need to prepare students from the early grades through high school in the essential skills, competencies, and dispositions needed to succeed in a computationally-dependent world. Thus, STEM+C advances the integration of computational thinking and computing activities in early childhood education through high school (pre-K-12) to provide a strong and developmental foundation in computing and computational thinking through the integration of computing in STEM teaching and learning, and/or the applied integration of STEM content in pre-K-12 computer science education.

Award Information

Anticipated Type of Award:

Standard Grant or Continuing Grant

Estimated Number of Awards:

25 to 35

Anticipated Funding Amount:

$49,895,000

Estimated program budget, number of awards and average award size/duration are subject to the availability of funds.

Eligibility Information

Who May Submit Proposals:

The categories of proposers eligible to submit proposals to the National Science Foundation are identified in the NSF Proposal & Award Policies & Procedures Guide (PAPPG), Chapter I.E.

Who May Serve as PI:

There are no restrictions or limits.

Limit on Number of Proposals per Organization:

There are no restrictions or limits.

Limit on Number of Proposals per PI or Co-PI:

There are no restrictions or limits.

Proposal Preparation and Submission Instructions

A. Proposal Preparation Instructions

  • Letters of Intent: Not required
  • Preliminary Proposal Submission: Not required

B. Budgetary Information

  • Cost Sharing Requirements:

    Inclusion of voluntary committed cost sharing is prohibited.

  • Indirect Cost (F&A) Limitations:

    Not Applicable

  • Other Budgetary Limitations:

    Not Applicable

C. Due Dates

  • Full Proposal Deadline(s) (due by 5 p.m. submitter's local time):

         March 29, 2017

STELAR Webinar on Thursday, July 28

Tuesday, July 26, 2016

NSF Opportunities: Broadening Participation in STEM  

 Hosted by STELAR on behalf of the National Science Foundation Directorate for Education and Human Resources. 

On behalf of the National Science Foundation Directorate for Education and Human Resources (EHR), you are invited to attend a special webinar on Thursday, July 28, 11:30-1:30 pm CDT, highlighting upcoming funding opportunities within EHR, especially  aimed at broadening participation in STEM.

REGISTER FOR WEBINAR

Program Officers from all four EHR Divisions will be presenting:

- Division for Research on Learning (DRL)
- Division for Undergraduate Education (DUE)
- Division for Graduate Education (DGE)
- Division for Human Resources and Development (HRD)

Program Highlights will include but are not limited to:

- EHR Core Research (ECR)
- Historically Black Colleges and Universities & Undergraduate Programs (HBCU-UP)
- Tribal Colleges & Undergraduate Programs (TCUP)
- Robert Noyce Scholarship Program
- Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (LSAMP)
- Improving Undergraduate STEM Education (IUSE)
- Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST)

You are encouraged to invite your colleagues to attend as well. In some cases, it may useful to reserve a conference room in your institution and invite faculty and program administrators from across the institution to attend the webinar collectively from one location.

We strongly encourage your participation. There will be opportunities to also ask the Program Officers questions and also receive tips on writing competitive NSF grant proposals.

The webinar is FREE but, registration is required.  The connection information will be sent to all registrants a week before the webinar.

We look forward to your participation!

Questions? Email stelar [at] edc [dot] org or visit our website: http://stelar.edc.org.

We hope you can join us!

~ The STELAR Team 

Dear Colleague Letter: Strengthening Transfer of Students from Two-year Hispanic-serving Institutions to Four-year STEM Programs

Monday, June 6, 2016

June 2, 2016

Dear Colleague:

The National Science Foundation (NSF) supports science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education research and other activities in order to develop innovative strategies for broadening the participation of women and men from groups underrepresented in all levels of the nation's STEM educational system and workforce. This effort is integral to the Strategic Re-envisioning for the Education and Human Resources Directorate (EHR).1

NSF is interested in receiving proposals to existing programs, listed below, that support the development of a comprehensive, knowledge-based and knowledge-generating opportunity that seeks to facilitate the successful transfer of students (particularly those who are historically underrepresented in STEM) from two-year Hispanic-serving Institutions (HSIs) to four-year institutions of their choice in order to pursue STEM baccalaureate degrees.

This is not a special competition or new program. Proposals submitted in response to this Dear Colleague Letter (DCL) must meet the requirements and deadlines of the program to which they are submitted.

Two-year HSIs are particularly encouraged to submit proposals in response to this DCL. All four-year institutions are eligible to submit proposals; however, four-year institutions are strongly encouraged to partner with a two-year HSI.

NSF encourages the submission of proposals that focus on innovative, evidence-based student recruitment and retention strategies at the community college level that show the greatest promise for strengthening progression to four-year STEM degree programs by students from groups traditionally underrepresented in STEM, with particular emphasis on Hispanic students.

Supported activities may include: Employing evidence-based team and cohort building operations (e.g., mentoring, learning communities, and social integration activities); student academic support (e.g. supplemental instruction and peer-led team learning); undergraduate research activities (e.g., research methods and hands-on experimentation); professional development and career support (e.g., conference attendance and presentation, participation in seminars, and colloquia) or other activities designed to enhance student retention in STEM and successful transfer to STEM baccalaureate-degree programs.

PARTICIPATING PROGRAMS

Louis Stokes Alliances for Minority Participation (LSAMP): NSF 15-594

Program Track: Bridge to the Baccalaureate (B2B)
HSI community college as lead institution -- may form alliances with other 2-year community colleges and 4-year IHEs for transfer to complete a 4-year STEM degree program.

Program Track: Pre-Alliance Planning Grants
HSIs may use this grant mechanism to establish partnerships to form new alliances.

Others: Conferences and Workshops

Program Officers:
A. James Hicks, ahicks [at] nsf [dot] gov
Martha James, mjames [at] nsf [dot] gov

NSF Scholarships in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (S-STEM): NSF 16-540.

Program Track 1: S-STEM Institutional Capacity Building
Track 1 is for institutions that have not had or do not currently have awards funded by the S-STEM program or the STEM Talent Expansion (STEP) program.

Program Track 2: S-STEM Design and Development
There are two types of projects in this track: (a) Single institution projects that focus on well-documented institutional needs or concerns; (b) Multi-Institutional Consortia that support institutional collaborations that focus on a common interest or problem.

Others: Conferences and Workshop

Program Officers:
Connie K. Della-Piana, cdelapi [at] nsf [dot] gov
Paul Tymann, ptymann [at] nsf [dot] gov
John Krupczak, jkrupcza [at] nsf [dot] gov
Yvette Weatherton, yweather [at] nsf [dot] gov
Kevin Lee, kelee [at] nsf [dot] gov

SUBMISSION DEADLINES

There are several track specific proposal submission deadlines for the LSAMP program. For S-STEM the submission deadline is April 20, 2017, and the third Thursday in April, thereafter. Proposers should contact NSF Program Officers to determine the appropriate program for submitting proposals.

FUNDING LEVELS AND AWARD DURATIONS

LSAMP Bridge to the Baccalaureate: Up to $500,000 per year for up to 3 years.

LSAMP Pre-Alliance Planning Grants: Up to $125,000 for up to 18 months.

S-STEM - Institutional Capacity Building: Up to $650,000 total for 5 years.

S-STEM - S-STEM Design and Development:

  • Single institution projects up to $1.0 million total for 5 years.
  • Multi-Institutional Consortia projects up to $5.0 million total for 5 years.

CONFERENCES

Proposals for conferences addressing critical challenges in undergraduate STEM education may be submitted at any time following consultation with a program officer associated with the program to which the conference is applicable. Conference proposals should be prepared and submitted in accordance with the guidance in the NSF Proposal and Award Policies and Procedures Guide, Part I: Grant Proposal Guide (GPG) (NSF 16-001): https://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsf16001. Specific instructions for conference proposals may be found in Chapter II.D.9.

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS

For proper processing, please make sure that the Project Summary includes the following identifier in the first sentence: DCL:HSI.

NSF uses the definition for Hispanic-Serving Institution (HSI) as an institution of higher education that is (a) a Title V eligible institution; and (b) has an enrollment of undergraduate full-time equivalent students that is at least 25 percent Hispanic students at the end of the award year immediately preceding the date of application, as defined in the Higher Education Act [Title V, Part A of the Higher Education Act as amended (20 U.S.C. 1101a (5)].

Sincerely,

Joan Ferrini-Mundy, Assistant Director
Directorate for Education and Human Resources


1 See Strategic Re-Envisioning for the Education and Human Resources Directorate, September 2014 https://www.nsf.gov/ehr/Pubs/AC_ReEnvisioning_Report_Sept_2014_01.pdf.
 

OISE Presents Accelerating Research: International Network-to-Network Collaboration

Event date(s): Friday, October 6, 2017


Participate in an AccelNet Informational Webinar:

October 6, 2017 2:00 - 4:00 PM
https://nsf.webex.com/nsf/onstage/g.php?MTID=e29874085681c819cf77a3ceb4ca7fd41

The National Science Foundation (NSF) Office of International Science and Engineering (OISE) invites individuals or groups of individuals from the U.S. research community to submit White Papers on topics in science, engineering, and/or STEM education that are ripe for international network-to-network collaboration. Additional information on this call and instructions on submitting a White Paper are provided in the Dear Colleague Letter. Please direct questions to oise-accelnet [at] nsf [dot] gov.

OISE is hosting public webinars to discuss the Dear Colleague Letter and answer questions from the research community.

Webinar 2: Oct. 6, 2017 – 2:00pm-4:00pm Eastern Time

 Password: Accel1234! 

Audio-only participation is available via phone by dialing 1-415-655-0002 (toll) and entering audio access code: 745 044 375. Note: To view real-time captions, open a separate browser page and go to www.fedrcc.us/.  Enter the event confirmation #3389221

 If you need reasonable/accessibility accommodations to participate, contact oise-accelnet [at] nsf [dot] gov in advance of the event date for coordination.

Meeting Type
Webcast

Contacts
Suzanne Abo, (703) 292-2704, oise-accelnet [at] nsf [dot] gov
       Preferred Contact Method: Email

NSF Related Organizations
NSF-Wide
Office of International Science and Engineering

Public Attachments
Dear Colleague Letter

Related Websites
Join Webinar 2-October 6 Meeting: https://nsf.webex.com/nsf/onstage/g.php?MTID=e29874085681c819cf77a3ceb4ca7fd41

OISE Presents Accelerating Research: International Network-to-Network Collaboration

Event date(s): Thursday, September 28, 2017


Participate in an AccelNet Informational Webinar:

September 28, 2017 3:00 - 5:00 PM
https://nsf.webex.com/nsf/onstage/g.php?MTID=ed7c79d9fb70a9d9e002d84918c724951

The National Science Foundation (NSF) Office of International Science and Engineering (OISE) invites individuals or groups of individuals from the U.S. research community to submit White Papers on topics in science, engineering, and/or STEM education that are ripe for international network-to-network collaboration. Additional information on this call and instructions on submitting a White Paper are provided in the Dear Colleague Letter. Please direct questions to oise-accelnet [at] nsf [dot] gov.

OISE is hosting public webinars to discuss the Dear Colleague Letter and answer questions from the research community.

Webinar 1: Sept. 28, 2017 – 3:00pm-5:00pm Eastern Time

Password: Accel1234!

 Audio-only participation is available via phone by dialing 1-415-655-0002 (toll) and entering audio access code: 740 312 533. Note: To view real-time captions, open a separate browser page and go to http://www.fedrcc.us/.  Enter the event confirmation #3389238

Meeting Type
Webcast

Contacts
Suzanne Abo, (703) 292-2704, oise-accelnet [at] nsf [dot] gov
       Preferred Contact Method: Email

NSF Related Organizations
NSF-Wide
Office of International Science and Engineering

Public Attachments
Dear Colleague Letter

Related Websites
Join Webinar 1-September 28 Meeting: https://nsf.webex.com/nsf/onstage/g.php?MTID=ed7c79d9fb70a9d9e002d84918c724951

NSF Opportunity - STELAR Webinar

Event date(s): Thursday, July 28, 2016


NSF Opportunities: Broadening Participation in STEM  

 Hosted by STELAR on behalf of the National Science Foundation Directorate for Education and Human Resources. 

On behalf of the National Science Foundation Directorate for Education and Human Resources (EHR), you are invited to attend a special webinar on Thursday, July 28, 11:30-1:30 pm CDT, highlighting upcoming funding opportunities within EHR, especially aimed at broadening participation in STEM.

REGISTER FOR WEBINAR

Program Officers from all four EHR Divisions will be presenting:

Division for Research on Learning (DRL)
Division for Undergraduate Education (DUE)
Division for Graduate Education (DGE)
Division for Human Resources and Development (HRD)

Program Highlights will include but are not limited to:

EHR Core Research (ECR)
Historically Black Colleges and Universities & Undergraduate Programs (HBCU-UP)
Tribal Colleges & Undergraduate Programs (TCUP)
Robert Noyce Scholarship Program
Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (LSAMP)
Improving Undergraduate STEM Education (IUSE)
Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST)

You are encouraged to invite your colleagues to attend as well. In some cases, it may useful to reserve a conference room in your institution and invite faculty and program administrators from across the institution to attend the webinar collectively from one location.

We strongly encourage your participation. There will be opportunities to also ask the Program Officers questions and also receive tips on writing competitive NSF grant proposals.

The webinar is FREE but, registration is required.  The connection information will be sent to all registrants a week before the webinar.

We look forward to your participation!

Questions? Email stelar [at] edc [dot] org or visit our website: http://stelar.edc.org.

We hope you can join us!

~ The STELAR Team