St. Louis

Announcing the Next MO DIRT Soil Health Survey Training! Fenton, MO

Friday, June 10, 2016

For more information, visit the MO DIRT website Event Page.

Register at MODirt [at] danforthcenter [dot] org


 

Job Announcements at the Danforth Center

Monday, May 9, 2016

Dr. Malia Gehan’s lab at the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center is looking to fill two positions: a postdoctoral position and lab technician position. See the details for each position below. Applications should be sent to careers [at] danforthcenter [dot] org.

Lab Technician Opportunity:
The Gehan lab (http://www.gehan-lab.org/) is looking to add an enthusiastic and creative fulltime Laboratory Technician / Laboratory Manager (40 hours / week). The position would mainly focus on research, but also include some managerial tasks like ordering supplies. Therefore good organizational skills, the desire to work in a team, and the ability to communicate are essential for this position. An ideal applicants might have experience in media making, sterile techniques, and basic plant care.

The Gehan laboratory actively engages the community through outreach and education activities, and lab members are encouraged to participate in mentoring and teaching programs. The position is renewable upon satisfactory performance and availability of funds. Salary is commensurate with experience.

Candidates should provide a current CV, list of at least three contacts for recommendation. Please email all application materials to careers [at] danforthcenter [dot] org with the subject line ‘Gehan Lab’.

The international, inclusive, and interdisciplinary research environment at the Danforth Center (http://www.danforthcenter.org/) offers an excellent opportunity for career development. Salaries are competitive and commensurate with experience, and the Danforth Center offers an excellent benefits package including medical and 403B matching. The Danforth Center is currently ranked in the top ten of places to work in scientific research, and the St. Louis region is a rich environment to work and live.

Postdoctoral Opportunity:
The Gehan lab (http://www.gehan-lab.org/) is looking to add an enthusiastic and creative postdoctoral researcher to work on mechanisms of temperature stress in grasses and pseudocereals. Ideal candidates would have recently obtained a Ph.D. in biochemistry, cell, developmental, genetics, genomics, molecular biology, plant biology, plant physiology, or other related field. Candidates with interest or experience in highthroughput plant phenomics or bioinformatics are highly encouraged to apply.

The Gehan laboratory actively engages the community through outreach and education activities, and lab members are encouraged to participate in mentoring and teaching programs. The position is renewable upon satisfactory performance and availability of funds. Salary is commensurate with experience.

Candidates should provide a current CV, list of at least three contacts for recommendation, and a cover letter that includes a statement of past research experience, an outline of future research objectives, and career goals. Please email all application materials to careers [at] danforthcenter [dot] org with the subject line ‘Gehan Lab’.

The international, inclusive, and interdisciplinary research environment at the Danforth Center (http://www.danforthcenter.org/) offers an excellent opportunity for career development. Salaries are competitive and commensurate with experience, and the Danforth Center offers an excellent benefits package including medical and 403B matching. The Danforth Center is currently ranked in the top ten of places to work in scientific research, and the St. Louis region is a rich environment to work and live.

Digging dirt pays off for one St. Louis high school student

Monday, March 14, 2016

Monica speaking to judges one-on-one about her research Presenting to the panel of judges
Many of us run for the sink when we get our hands dirty, but not Monica Malone who loves plunging her hands into a pile of rich soil.
 
“I find the layers, or horizons, in the soil and the differences in texture very interesting,” admits Malone.
 
Her passion hit pay dirt recently when the senior at Horton Watkins Ladue High School took home first place at the Academy of Science St. Louis Science Fair this past February for her experiment on soil microbes. The award came with a $3,000 college scholarship and an all-expense-paid trip to the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair in Phoenix, AZ, this May.
 
For her research, Malone studied differences in the diversity of microbial communities in tilled versus non-tilled soils. Tilling, which involves mechanically preparing an agricultural field by breaking the ground, is thought to disrupt the microorganisms in the soil and adversely affect soil health. No-till, in contrast, is thought to provide a more favorable environment for soil microbes and thus contribute to the health of the soil.
 
To test if the microbial communities were affected by tilling or not, Malone collected soil samples from various sites and then analyzed the samples for nutrient content, pH, active carbon, and other characteristics. She also extracted DNA from individual microbe colonies found in the soil samples.
 
“Through sequencing, I found a greater diversity of soil microbes in the no-till soil,” said Malone. 
 
She then evaluated the difference in microbial diversity using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), a method that isolates total microbial genome DNA to compare DNA banding patterns between till and no-till soil cores. Results showed that the microbial communities in tilled soil were less diverse than in non-tilled soil.
 
The finding adds to a growing body of evidence against tilling as a beneficial agricultural practice. Tilling already has been shown to contribute to soil erosion and release of CO2 into the environment, contributing to global warming.
 
“My research helps prove that tilling soil also disrupts the natural microbiome in the soil. It is possible that many beneficial microbes may be lost when tilling occurs,” she said.
 
Malone conducted her research at the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, where she has been doing research for nearly three years with her mentor Dr. Terry Woodford-Thomas. As Leader of the Science Education & Outreach Team for the Missouri Transect Project, Woodford-Thomas initiated Missourians Doing Impact Research Together (MO DIRT), a citizen science project focused on soil health.
 
“I became interested in soil science after Dr. Woodford-Thomas pulled a bunch of soil cores and brought them into the lab,” recalls Malone. “Her excitement about soil science inspired me to learn more about soil science in general.”
 
Malone entered her research project into the Honors Division, which consisted of two rounds of competition – a one-on-one interview with judges and a 10-minute presentation to a group of judges followed by a 5-minute Q&A. Malone admits she was at first nervous.
 
“But as soon as I started to present, I felt much more confident. I was able to clearly convey my message and answer all of the judges’ questions,” she said.
 
Malone will be recognized at the Academy of Science 2016 Outstanding Scientist Awards Dinner at the Chase Park Plaza on April 7, 2016. 

For more information about the Academy of Science St. Louis Science Fair, visit:
 
The Academy of Science – St. Louis
St. Louis, MO 63110
(314) 591-0310

ATGC-STL Conference: Linking People, Linking Genes

Tuesday, January 19, 2016

Harris-Stowe State University will be hosting the Advocating Translational Genetics/Genomics Conference in St. Louis (ATGC-STL) Genetics Symposium on February 27th, 2016.

The trainee-organized symposium hosted by Harris-Stowe State University (HSSU) aims to pioneer early exposure to quality research in genetics, and to promote genetic literacy of under-represented student populations at the high school, undergraduate, and graduate levels. The symposium will offer activities for a wide range of genetics scholars and provide the opportunity for students to present their work in the genetics field, interact with university faculty, and obtain information on undergraduate and graduate level opportunities in genetics research.

For more information about the symposium, visit the ATGC-STL website and Twitter.  To register, click here.

2015 STEM Summit Agenda Announced

Friday, September 25, 2015

The Missouri Mathematics and Science Coalition will be hosting its 4th bi-annual MO STEM Summit, November 4-5, 2015 in St. Louis. This event will bring together leaders, visionaries from education, business and government to share best practices and to advance the agenda for innovation in Missouri's STEM education and policy development.

This year's Summit will focus attention on high-impact STEM Programming that is being delivered in the K-12 and Higher Education sectors. Emphasis is also being placed upon business and education partnerships that help with career pathway development.

Who should attend? Anyone who is focused on STEM Education at the K-12, postsecondary and in business industry.

2015 STEM Summit Details

Wednesday, November 4th  & Thursday, November 5th, 2015
DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel- Chesterfield
16625 Swingley Bridge Road
St. Louis, MO 63017

Click Here for the Agenda

Please contact Brian Crouse at bcrouse [at] mochamber [dot] com or 573-634-3511 or visit www.momathandscience.com.

Missouri Transect NSF Site Visit

Event date(s): Tuesday, September 19, 2017 to Thursday, September 21, 2017
Location: St. Louis, MO


The National Science Foundation EPSCoR office will visit Missouri for the Year 4 site visit on September 19-21, 2017. The site visit will be held in St. Louis and will host 5-6 panelists to review the current activities of Missouri Transect and progress to-date. Fifteen student will be selected to give poster presentations. Missouri Transect will also take panelists and the NSF program officer to various sites around St. Louis to tour our facilities.

Plant Imaging Consortium Annual Meeting

Event date(s): Monday, June 5, 2017 to Tuesday, June 6, 2017
Location: Hilton St. Louis at the Ballpark, St. Louis, MO


EPSCoR Imaging Workshop - April 13, 2017

Event date(s): Thursday, April 13, 2017
Location: Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, 975 North Warson Road, Saint Louis, MO 63132


Date:                               April 13, 2017, 8:45 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
Location:                       Donald Danforth Plant Science Center
                                            975 North Warson Road
                                            Saint Louis, MO 63132

 

The EPSCoR imaging workshop will be held April 13, 2017 at the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center in Saint Louis, MO. The purpose of the workshop is to link imaging and image processing to phenotyping and to share collective capacity on plant imaging technology and data. There will be presentations and work groups so that researchers can interact with each other’s data.  There will also be opportunities for imaging equipment demonstrations and presentations during breaks and lunch.   There is a $25.00 registration fee to attend this workshop.  

Click here for the workshop agenda.

Register here: 

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/missouri-transect-imaging-workshop-tickets-32164138805

Hotel:

Click here for hotel accommodation at the Drury Inn and Suites-Creve Coeur located at 11980 Olive Blvd, Creve Coeur, MO 63141.  If you require shuttle service between the Drury and the Danforth Center, please request during check-in.

For questions, contact:

Kathleen Mackey, kmackey [at] danforthcenter [dot] org, 314-587-1203

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