science

Dear Colleague Letter: Supporting the Re-Entry of Women and Women Veterans in the STEM Workforce through NSF INCLUDES

Tuesday, February 12, 2019

NSF 19-038

February 8, 2019

Dear Colleague:

NSF will consider supplemental funding requests for traineeships and conference proposals that support efforts aimed at enhancing the science, technology, engineering or mathematics (STEM) knowledge base, skillset, leadership and management capacities, and/or contributions to the STEM enterprise of women following a career break. Women veterans' entry or re-entry into the STEM workforce is of particular interest. NSF invites submission of supplemental funding requests to current NSF INCLUDES awards or other NSF-funded awards in the programs described below to support traineeships for undergraduate and graduate students after a career break. Supplements to support traineeships for women who are veterans and women who have interrupted their studies at the undergraduate level and want to enter or re-enter a STEM career are especially encouraged. Conference proposals should address research to enhance understanding of the process of entry and re-entry in STEM after a career break (e.g., factors associated with access, retention and inclusion) as well as related barriers and opportunities women face entering and re-entering the STEM workforce, especially in the technical fields.

In this Dear Colleague Letter (DCL), a career break is defined as a period of at least one year resulting in the need for an individual to gain skills and experience to enter or re-enter the STEM workforce. Circumstances that may necessitate a career break include (but are not limited to): family care, military service, professional volunteerism (e.g., Teach for America), or child rearing. For traineeships, the onus will be on the proposer to justify the need for the traineeship.

To address the underrepresentation of women in STEM technical fields, traineeships in the applied sciences, skilled trades, and modern technologies are of particular interest. Applicable fields might include but are not limited to, advanced manufacturing, agriculture, computer and information science, energy, engineering, geospatial sciences, micro- and nano-technology, and safety and security. This DCL will not support traineeships for individuals who wish to pursue careers as health, veterinary, or medical technicians.

Collaborations with professional societies, national laboratories, field stations, NSF- funded centers, informal science centers and organizations, government agencies, and non-governmental organizations and academic partners (especially community and technical colleges and minority-serving institutions) are encouraged.

The overarching goal of NSF INCLUDES is to achieve significant impact at scale in transforming STEM education and workforce development by educating a diverse, STEM-capable workforce that includes talented individuals from all sectors of the Nation's population. This DCL seeks innovative approaches to better understand women's engagement in STEM by focusing on women's experience with re-entry to the STEM workforce. This DCL leverages the NSF INCLUDES National Network to expand the ranks of women in STEM, as well as research capacity and understanding of women's re-entry into the STEM workforce.

This special funding opportunity is partially funded by a generous gift from The Boeing Company as part of its Women Make Us Better and Women in Leadership Initiatives. Awards may also be co-funded by other NSF programs.

FUNDING OPPORTUNITY

This DCL encourages submission of (1) traineeship supplemental funding requests and (2) conference proposals that are aligned with the tenets described above as well as the broader vision of NSF INCLUDES.

  1. Traineeship Supplements - The purpose of traineeships is to develop the skills, knowledge, and competencies required to pursue and succeed in a STEM career. Special emphasis should be placed on training and professional development, including significant mentorship and leadership development. Direct support could include tuition and fees for classes to support skillset development, and internships and research experiences designed to provide rigorous training. Women who are veterans and women who have interrupted their studies at the undergraduate or graduate level and want to enter or re-enter a STEM career are encouraged to apply.

    Recipients of traineeships must be U.S. citizens or nationals, or permanent residents.

  2. Conferences - Proposals for conferences or special convenings that lead to a better understanding of issues involving the entry or re-entry of women, in particular women veterans, to STEM careers after a break will be considered for support. Conferences could explore and discuss issues such as the current knowledge base about the experience of re-entry into STEM among women in general and women veterans in particular; how women veterans navigate STEM pathways to enter or re-enter the STEM workforce; and/or the unique challenges to working in STEM fields for women who have experienced a break in their career. Conferences and convenings should be outcomes-based, and a final report should include recommendations and a statement of the impacts of the event. Awardees should plan to publish conference proceedings, and otherwise widely disseminate the discussion and outcomes. Proposals that include participation by organizations involved in the NSF INCLUDES National Network are especially encouraged.

SUBMISSION AND REVIEW

Supplemental funding requests and conference proposals must be received by 5 p.m., submitter's local time, on April 15, 2019.

  1. Traineeship Supplements

    Funds may be used for salary or stipend, travel (relocation costs), tuition and fees, health insurance, and materials and supplies to support the trainee. The grantee is permitted to request indirect costs in accordance with the negotiated rate in effect at the time of the award. If requesting support for more than one trainee, the individual requests may be combined into one supplemental funding request.

    Each supplemental funding request must include "NSF INCLUDES DCL" in the first sentence of the summary section of the request for supplemental funding along with the following components for each trainee:

    1. A two-page summary that describes the traineeship. The request must include a concise statement describing how the activities will prepare the trainee to enter or re-enter the STEM workforce.
    2. A resume of the proposed trainee (up to two pages) that contains (but not limited to) the following information:
      1. educational preparation;
      2. professional employment history; and
      3. other information relevant to the proposed traineeship.
    3. A letter from the proposed mentor describing the mentoring and training that will be provided to the trainee during the period of support.
    4. A budget and budget justification.

      The amount requested for supplemental support must be less than 20% of the original award amount, with total costs not to exceed $150,000. Funding is dependent on the availability of funds. Supplemental funding requests should be prepared and submitted in accordance with the guidance in the NSF Proposal & Award Policies & Procedures Guide (PAPPG), Chapter VI.E.4.

      Principal Investigators with current NSF INCLUDES awards or current awards in the programs listed below are eligible to apply for traineeship supplements through this DCL:

    For more information about the programs listed above, please consult with the point of contact for the program of interest denoted on the program webpage.

    Eligible Principal Investigator(s) of NSF awards should contact their cognizant Program Director(s)AND NSF INCLUDES via email atnsfincludes [at] nsf [dot] gov (nsfincludes [at] nsf [dot] gov) to discuss their request for supplemental support by March 29, 2019.

    The proposals will be reviewed internally by NSF Program Officers. All supplements are subject to (a) the availability of funds, and (b) review of the quality of the supplemental funding request.

  2. Conferences

    Conference proposals are new proposals and not requests for supplemental funding to existing NSF awards.

    Conference proposals will be funded for up to 2 years and a $250,000 maximum.

    They should be prepared and submitted in accordance with the guidance in PAPPG Chapter II.E.7, designating HRD -NSF INCLUDES (032Y) as the cognizant program.

    The "Conference" proposal type should be selected in the proposal preparation module in FastLane or Grants.gov and include "NSF INCLUDES DCL" in the title and first sentence of the project summary of the proposal.

    Conference proposals will be reviewed by a panel of external experts and are subject to the availability of funds.

    The NSF Advanced Technological Education Program (ATE) is especially interested in providing partial support for strong, innovative conference proposals submitted to NSF INCLUDES through this DCL that align with the goals of the ATE program and the tenets of this DCL.

    Interested proposers should contact NSF INCLUDES via email at nsfincludes [at] nsf [dot] gov by March 29, 2019 to discuss their conference idea.

Dear Colleague Letter: FY 2017 Innovations at the INFEWS Funding Opportunity on Nitrogen, Phosphorus, and Water

Tuesday, October 18, 2016

NSF 17-013

October 7, 2016

Dear Colleagues:

In 2010, NSF established the Science, Engineering, and Education for Sustainability (SEES)1 investment area to lay the research foundation for decision capabilities and technologies aimed at mitigating and adapting to environmental changes that threaten sustainability. Some SEES investments advanced a systems-based approach to understanding, predicting, and reacting to stress upon, and changes in, the linked natural, social, and built environments. In this context, the importance of understanding the interconnected and interdependent systems involving food, energy, and water (FEW) has emerged. In 2015, NSF Issued a Dear Colleague Letter (DCL): SEES: Interactions of Food Systems with Water and Energy Systems2 to accelerate fundamental understanding and stimulate basic research on the connections and interdependencies among these three systems.

Through this Dear Colleague Letter (DCL), issued by the Divisions of Chemistry (CHE) and Materials Research (DMR) in the Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences and the Division of Chemical, Bioengineering, Environmental and Transport Systems (CBET) in the Directorate for Engineering, the NSF aims to specifically focus on advancing knowledge of the nitrogen and phosphorus cycles; the production and use of fertilizers for food production; and the detection, separation, and reclamation/recycling of nitrogen- and phosphorus-containing species in and from complex aqueous environments.

Humanity is reliant upon the physical resources and natural systems of the Earth for the provision of food, energy, and water. It is becoming imperative that we determine how society can best integrate across the natural and built environments to provide for a growing demand for food, water and energy while maintaining appropriate ecosystem services. Factors contributing to stresses in the food, energy, and water systems include increasing regional, social, and political pressures as result of land use change, climate variability, and heterogeneous resource distribution. These interconnections and interdependencies associated with the food, energy and water nexus create research grand challenges in understanding how the complex, coupled processes of society and the environment function now, and in the future. There is a critical need for research that enables new means of adapting to future challenges. The FEW systems must be defined broadly, incorporating physical processes (such as built infrastructure and new technologies for more efficient resource utilization), natural processes (such as biogeochemical and hydrologic cycles), biological processes (such as agroecosystem structure and productivity), social/behavioral processes (such as decision making and governance), and cyber elements. Investigations of these complex systems may produce discoveries that cannot emerge from research on food or energy or water systems alone. It is the synergy among these components, in the context of sustainability that will open innovative science and engineering pathways to produce new knowledge and novel technologies to solve the challenges of scarcity and variability. This DCL, which is part of the Innovation at the Nexus of Food, Energy, and Water Systems (INFEWS) portfolio,3 addresses emerging science, technology, and engineering relevant to food, energy and water systems.

The availability of nitrogen, phosphorus, and water are the three main factors that limit our ability to produce enough food to feed the growing population of the planet. The nitrogen cycle is one of the most significant biogeochemical cycles on Earth, as nitrogen is an essential nutrient for all forms of life. Although freely available in the atmosphere as dinitrogen, access to fixed forms of nitrogen constitutes, in many cases, the most limiting factor for plant growth. The industrial production of ammonia for fertilizers via the current Haber-Bosch process is an energy intensive process that consumes 1-2% of the world's annual energy supply. For these reasons, the need for advanced catalytic methods for the reduction of dinitrogen to ammonia remains a requirement for sustainability in the food, energy and water systems cycle.

Similarly, phosphorus is also essential to plant and animal nutrition. Approximately 80% of the world's economically-viable phosphorus is obtained from "phosphate rock" that is localized in a single place. Phosphate rock is a more concentrated commodity than petroleum, and like petroleum, the world's supply of phosphorus is threatened by political instability and monopolistic economic practices. Management of phosphorus is a bit of a paradox because, while the world may face a shortage of phosphorus-containing fertilizer later this century, many regions are currently afflicted with an oversupply in both inland and coastal waters causing algal blooms that can produce extremely dangerous toxins that can sicken or kill people or animals, create dead zones in the water, raise treatment costs for drinking water, and hurt industries that depend on clean water. The ability to provide field-deployable, inexpensive, and environmentally-and energetically-sustainable sensors for real-time application and monitoring of nitrogen or phosphorus-containing species to agriculture while reducing the amount of these species in waste or run-off streams would benefit food production, benefit water quality, and result in significantly less energy consumption.

The increased demands for fresh water for crops/livestock and energy production will significantly add to the current stress on non-renewable groundwater resources. It is estimated that seven billion people in sixty countries will experience water scarcity by 2050 at current rates of water usage. This will place additional stress on both food supplies and energy consumption rates. These needs necessitate scientific and technological innovations that will address global problems that center on fresh water. In particular, the food production system generates waste streams that are characterized by high concentrations of organic matter, nitrogen- and phosphorus-containing species in water. New approaches are needed to overcome the cost of inefficient and energy-intensive detection, sequestration, and removal/recycling of such species while also preserving water quality.

This component of the NSF Innovations at the Nexus of the Food, Energy and Waters Systems (INFEWS) investment is designed to advance a new understanding of the role of the chemistry of nitrogen, phosphorous, and water in the nexus of food, energy and water systems, "INFEWS: N/P/H2O." While fundamental science and engineering research will underpin solutions to these areas of national and international need, it must also be recognized that technological innovations themselves require resources for development and deployment. Ostensible solutions to the challenge of N, P, and water supply cannot be premised on the assumption that energy, chemical feedstocks, and other required resources will be available in great abundance.

In FY 2017, the topics of interest in INFEWS: N/P/H2O include innovative, fundamental research to:

  1. advance catalytic methods for the reduction of dinitrogen to ammonia that permit reductions in the energy requirements for fertilizer production;
  2. develop new sensing modalities that will lead to field-deployable, inexpensive, and environmentally and energetically sustainable sensors for real-time monitoring of nitrogen- or phosphorus-containing species as they move, via agricultural run-off, to other water systems; and
  3. develop methods for the selective and efficient detection, sequestration/separation, and recycling of nitrogen and phosphorous species from water (For proposals submitted to CHE, proposals should focus on gaining an understanding of the supramolecular recognition and binding of environmentally-relevant nitrogen- and phosphorus-containing species.); and
  4. develop new materials to optimize the availability of N and control the utilization of P while managing effluents within the context of sustainable energy and preservation of our natural resources.

Proposals in response to this investment area should be submitted to the existing program of interest in –CHE, DMR and CBET within the existing submission windows (deadlines) of the programs. The proposal title must begin with "INFEWS N/P/H2O:". Other than the proposal title, the cover page should be prepared as a regular unsolicited proposal submission to the program. The most competitive proposals will address how the project conceptually advances innovations at the nexus of the food, energy, and water systems and sustainability of the proposed solution, i.e., the monetary and energetic costs for translation and scale-up.

Proposals are welcome from either multiple or single investigators. Interdisciplinary proposals that involve principal investigators traditionally supported by the three participating divisions (CHE, DMR, and CBET) are also welcome. Such proposals should be submitted to the most relevant program in CHE, DMR, or CBET. CHE and DMR welcome proposals responding to this Dear Colleague Letter (DCL) in all programs, while CBET welcomes proposals responding to this DCL in the Environmental Engineering, Environmental Sustainability, or Catalysis and Biocatalysis Programs. Please consult the Divisional webpages for more details on specific interests.4,5,6

The challenges at the food, energy, and water nexus are frequently international, and experts around the globe have relevant expertise and resources. Proposals including international collaboration are encouraged when those efforts enhance the merit of the proposed work. The U.S. team's international counterparts generally should have support or obtain funding through their own national or regional sources.

Proposals may be submitted in combination with other solicitations. For example, if there are strong collaborations with industry, the Dear Colleague Letter: Grant Opportunities for Academic Liaison with Industry (GOALI)7 can be used in conjunction with this effort. Similarly, proposals may be submitted in combination with the Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program,8 Facilitating Research at Primarily Undergraduate Institutions: Research in Undergraduate Institutions (RUI) and Research Opportunity Awards (ROA)9 solicitation. These proposals should be submitted to the appropriate solicitation and add INFEWS to the title (For example, RUI: INFEWS N/P/H2O: Name of your proposal). Other mechanisms such as EAGER10 and INSPIRE11 may also be appropriate, but principal investigators are required to check with the cognizant program officers for additional guidance. For general questions about INFEWS, email the listed representatives in either CHE,12 DMR,13 or CBET.14

To see examples of awards made under the Food-Energy-Water investment area, visit the NSF Award Abstracts Database,15 and enter 'food, energy, and water' in the 'Search Award for:' dialogue field. Alternatively, please visit the webpages of the disciplinary programs of interest in the participating divisions. Under each program, find the link to recent awards made in that program and look for those that contain `FEW' in the proposal title.

We are excited by the opportunities in the INFEWS area and encourage our communities to contribute to our sustainable future by participating in this important funding investment area. If interested, please contact the Program Officers listed in References 11, 12 and 13, rather than the signatories of this DCL, for assistance.

Fleming Crim
Assistant Director
Directorate for Mathematical & Physical Sciences

Pramod Khargonekar
Assistant Director
Directorate for Engineering


References

  1. Science, Engineering and Education for Sustainability NSF-Wide Investment (SEES): https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=504707
  2. SEES: Interactions of Food Systems with Water and Energy Systems DCL: https://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsf15040
  3. https://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsf15040
  4. Division of Chemistry webpage: https://www.nsf.gov/div/index.jsp?div=CHE
  5. Division of Materials Research webpage: https://www.nsf.gov/div/index.jsp?div=DMR
  6. Division of Chemical, Bioengineering, Environmental and Transport Systems webpage: https://www.nsf.gov/div/index.jsp?div=CBET
  7. GOALI: https://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsf16099
  8. CAREER: https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=503214
  9. RUI: https://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsf14579
  10. EAGER https://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=gpg
  11. INSPIRE: https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=504852
  12. CHE Program Officers: Tim Patten (tpatten [at] nsf [dot] gov), Suk-Wah Tam-Chang (stamchan [at] nsf [dot] gov), Lin He, (lhe [at] nsf [dot] gov) and Colby Foss (cfoss [at] nsf [dot] gov).
  13. DMR Program Officers: Alex Klironomos (aklirono [at] nsf [dot] gov), Andrew Lovinger (alovinge [at] nsf [dot] gov), and Sean L. Jones (sljones [at] nsf [dot] gov).
  14. CBET Program Officers: William Cooper (wcooper [at] nsf [dot] gov), Bruce Hamilton (bhamilto [at] nsf [dot] gov) and Robert McCabe (rmccabe [at] nsf [dot] gov).
  15. NSF Awards Search: https://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/

10th Annual Graduate Climate Conference Accepting Abstracts

Thursday, May 26, 2016

There is still one week left to submit an abstract to the 10th Annual Graduate Climate Conference, which will be held October 28-30, 2016 at the University of Washington Pack Forest Conference Center.  The Graduate Climate Conference (GCC) is an interdisciplinary climate conference run by graduate students, for graduate students, with the goal of assembling a broad range of talks and posters featuring high-quality research focused on past, present, and future climate change and its impacts. 

We encourage students at all stages of their graduate career to apply and we seek abstracts on climate research from a variety of disciplines from the physical, natural, and social sciences and humanities, including: anthropology, atmospheric sciences, biology, Earth and environmental sciences, economics, engineering, ethics, geography, law, oceanography, public policy, and resource management. 

We highly encourage abstracts from students with traditionally under-represented backgrounds.

The abstract submission period opened on April 11 and closes June 1. Lodging and meals are covered for all participants. Limited travel funding is also available. Please see our website for more information and for submitting abstracts: www.graduateclimateconference.com

 

 

Frequently Asked Questions for NSF INCLUDES

Monday, March 28, 2016

NSF has released a list of FAQs for the Inclusion across the Nation of Communities of Learners of Underrepresented Discoverers in Engineering and Science (INCLUDES) program:

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) for NSF INCLUDES

  1. The solicitation states that an organization may serve as the lead institution on only one Design and Development Launch Pilot. Can our organization submit more than one preliminary proposal?
  2. Is a PI permitted to submit more than one preliminary proposal?
  3. Can a 501 (c)3 non-profit organization serve as the lead institution for a Design and Development Launch Pilot? What if we are a school district?
  4. The solicitation indicates that NSF INCLUDES aims to "improve the preparation, increase the participation, and ensure the contributions of individuals from groups that have traditionally been underrepresented and underserved in the STEM enterprise, including women, members of racial and ethnic groups, persons with disabilities, and persons with low socio-economic status." But, later it references only "women, blacks, Hispanics, and people with disabilities." Which populations does NSF INCLUDES target?
  5. How quickly will my preliminary proposal be reviewed? Will the review be internal or external?
  6. Should a Design and Development Launch Pilot preliminary proposal be submitted to a Directorate and Division consistent with the proposal's focus and will different Directorates fund different numbers of Launch Pilots?
  7. Are Design and Development Launch Pilot preliminary proposals expected to be interdisciplinary or are discipline-specific proposals permitted?
  8. Should all preliminary proposals use a collective impact approach in order to be competitive?
  9. The solicitation states that in FY 2017, NSF will invite proposals to form NSF INCLUDES Alliances. Must one first receive a Design and Development Pilot Launch award to be eligible to compete for an NSF INCLUDES Alliance?
  10. Must the President or Chancellor of my university be the PI on a preliminary proposal?
  1. The solicitation states that an organization may serve as the lead institution on only one Design and Development Launch Pilot. Can our organization submit more than one preliminary proposal?

    Yes. The solicitation does not restrict the number of preliminary proposals per organization. Thus, organizations are permitted to submit more than one preliminary proposal. Organizations are cautioned, however, that the solicitation limits each organization to one Design and Development Launch Pilot proposal. Thus, following the review of preliminary proposals, an organization will not be invited to submit more than one full proposal.

  2. Is a PI permitted to submit more than one preliminary proposal?

    Yes. As with the organization limit, the solicitation does not restrict the number of preliminary proposals on which an individual may serve as PI. However, when it comes to full proposals, an individual may only serve as a PI on one full proposal and may serve as a co-PI on up to three full proposals. Thus, the Invite/Do Not Invite decision process will be designed to ensure that no one individual is identified as the PI for more than one proposal, or as co-PI for more than three proposals.

  3. Can a 501 (c)3 non-profit organization serve as the lead institution for a Design and Development Launch Pilot? What if we are a school district?

    Yes. Both non-profit organizations and local school districts may submit a proposal. The categories of proposers eligible to submit proposals to the National Science Foundation are identified in the Grant Proposal Guide (GPG), Chapter I, Section E http://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=gpg.

  4. The solicitation indicates that NSF INCLUDES aims to "improve the preparation, increase the participation, and ensure the contributions of individuals from groups that have traditionally been underrepresented and underserved in the STEM enterprise, including women, members of racial and ethnic groups, persons with disabilities, and persons with low socio-economic status." But, later it references only "women, blacks, Hispanics, and people with disabilities." Which populations does NSF INCLUDES target?

    In submitting a preliminary proposal, PIs should focus on one or more groups that are "underrepresented and underserved in the STEM enterprise." Groups traditionally underrepresented or underserved in STEM include: women, persons with disabilities, African Americans/Blacks, Hispanic Americans, American Indians, Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiians, Native Pacific Islanders, and persons from economically disadvantaged backgrounds.

  5. How quickly will my preliminary proposal be reviewed? Will the review be internal or external?

    Program Directors will make every effort to communicate the decision to Invite/Do Not Invite full proposals based on panel recommendations and additional portfolio considerations via FastLane by May 6th or shortly thereafter.

  6. Should a Design and Development Launch Pilot preliminary proposal be submitted to a Directorate and Division consistent with the proposal's focus and will different Directorates fund different numbers of Launch Pilots?

    No. All preliminary proposals and full proposals should be submitted to the Division of Human Resource Development (HRD) within the Directorate for Education and Human Resources (EHR). While support for NSF INCLUDES comes from all Directorates and Offices, the award decisions will be made at the Foundation level based on alignment with NSF INCLUDES' vision and goals. While portfolio balance will be one consideration, awards will be made to the best proposals regardless of discipline or home Directorate/Division.

  7. Are Design and Development Launch Pilot preliminary proposals expected to be interdisciplinary or are discipline-specific proposals permitted?

    There is no requirement that proposals be either interdisciplinary or discipline-specific. Organizations and teams of PIs, co-PIs and key personnel may come together with a specific disciplinary or interdisciplinary focus, but neither is a requirement. Key to a successful proposal is the identification of a specific, high-impact broadening participation in STEM goal with measurable objectives as well as an argument that the set of partners being assembled includes all who are needed to successfully achieve that goal.

  8. Should all preliminary proposals use a collective impact approach in order to be competitive?

    The use of a collective impact framing and approach is not required. However, each preliminary proposal must articulate and justify the framework for collaboration, the processes for the development of a shared goal for broadening participation, and identify mutually reinforcing activities. Keep in mind that whatever framework is used must provide for scaling and must include openness to multiple (and new) partners.

  9. The solicitation states that in FY 2017, NSF will invite proposals to form NSF INCLUDES Alliances. Must one first receive a Design and Development Pilot Launch award to be eligible to compete for an NSF INCLUDES Alliance?

    Yes. Design and Development Launch Pilot awardees are expected to carry out and report on the results of projects to demonstrate their ability to implement a collective impact-style approach to addressing their selected broadening participation challenge. They are expected to demonstrate how teams and organizations can be reconfigured and joined together to form new alliances with common goals and purposes and collective impact-style approaches, with a strategy for how the effective practices of the Alliance can be deployed at scale. The accomplishments of a Launch Pilot will be assessed as part of the review of the subsequent NSF INCLUDES Alliance proposal. New partners may be invited to join a Design and Development Pilot that is submitting an Alliance proposal.

  10. Must the President or Chancellor of my university be the PI on a preliminary proposal?

    No. NSF expects senior leaders to be highly engaged in this important program as encouraged by NSF Director France Córdova in her recent Dear Colleague Letter (http://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsf16048). But the PI may be any individual eligible to be a PI at that university. Recall though that only one full proposal may be submitted from each organization. The expectation is that the PI will "have experience in leading distributed teams and organizations." (NSF 16-544).

The National STEM Report Released

Thursday, November 19, 2015

The ACT has released its 2015 National STEM Report this week, which assesses levels of achievement and levels of interest in STEM among college-ready high school students. STEM is Science, Computer Science and Mathematics, Medical and Health, and Engineering and Technology. The report found that about half of US high school graduates have expressed interest in STEM majors and careers. Other key findings include:

  1. Interest in STEM remains high
  2. Students with STEM interest that is both expressed and measured outperformed their peers
  3. For the first time, students are measured against the ACT STEM College Readiness Benchmark
  4. Interest in teaching STEM subject areas continues to lag

This report shows achievement levels in each area of STEM on the national level, as well as the actual number and percentage of students interested in specific majors and occupations.

View the report here or by clicking the image below:

NSF INCLUDES Supplemental Funding and Conference Funding Opportunities

Event date(s): Monday, April 15, 2019


NSF 19-038

Dear Colleague Letter: Supporting the Re-Entry of Women and Women Veterans in the STEM Workforce through NSF INCLUDES

February 8, 2019

Dear Colleague:

NSF will consider supplemental funding requests for traineeships and conference proposals that support efforts aimed at enhancing the science, technology, engineering or mathematics (STEM) knowledge base, skillset, leadership and management capacities, and/or contributions to the STEM enterprise of women following a career break. Women veterans' entry or re-entry into the STEM workforce is of particular interest. NSF invites submission of supplemental funding requests to current NSF INCLUDES awards or other NSF-funded awards in the programs described below to support traineeships for undergraduate and graduate students after a career break. Supplements to support traineeships for women who are veterans and women who have interrupted their studies at the undergraduate level and want to enter or re-enter a STEM career are especially encouraged. Conference proposals should address research to enhance understanding of the process of entry and re-entry in STEM after a career break (e.g., factors associated with access, retention and inclusion) as well as related barriers and opportunities women face entering and re-entering the STEM workforce, especially in the technical fields.

In this Dear Colleague Letter (DCL), a career break is defined as a period of at least one year resulting in the need for an individual to gain skills and experience to enter or re-enter the STEM workforce. Circumstances that may necessitate a career break include (but are not limited to): family care, military service, professional volunteerism (e.g., Teach for America), or child rearing. For traineeships, the onus will be on the proposer to justify the need for the traineeship.

To address the underrepresentation of women in STEM technical fields, traineeships in the applied sciences, skilled trades, and modern technologies are of particular interest. Applicable fields might include but are not limited to, advanced manufacturing, agriculture, computer and information science, energy, engineering, geospatial sciences, micro- and nano-technology, and safety and security. This DCL will not support traineeships for individuals who wish to pursue careers as health, veterinary, or medical technicians.

Collaborations with professional societies, national laboratories, field stations, NSF- funded centers, informal science centers and organizations, government agencies, and non-governmental organizations and academic partners (especially community and technical colleges and minority-serving institutions) are encouraged.

The overarching goal of NSF INCLUDES is to achieve significant impact at scale in transforming STEM education and workforce development by educating a diverse, STEM-capable workforce that includes talented individuals from all sectors of the Nation's population. This DCL seeks innovative approaches to better understand women's engagement in STEM by focusing on women's experience with re-entry to the STEM workforce. This DCL leverages the NSF INCLUDES National Network to expand the ranks of women in STEM, as well as research capacity and understanding of women's re-entry into the STEM workforce.

This special funding opportunity is partially funded by a generous gift from The Boeing Company as part of its Women Make Us Better and Women in Leadership Initiatives. Awards may also be co-funded by other NSF programs.

FUNDING OPPORTUNITY

This DCL encourages submission of (1) traineeship supplemental funding requests and (2) conference proposals that are aligned with the tenets described above as well as the broader vision of NSF INCLUDES.

  1. Traineeship Supplements - The purpose of traineeships is to develop the skills, knowledge, and competencies required to pursue and succeed in a STEM career. Special emphasis should be placed on training and professional development, including significant mentorship and leadership development. Direct support could include tuition and fees for classes to support skillset development, and internships and research experiences designed to provide rigorous training. Women who are veterans and women who have interrupted their studies at the undergraduate or graduate level and want to enter or re-enter a STEM career are encouraged to apply.

    Recipients of traineeships must be U.S. citizens or nationals, or permanent residents.

  2. Conferences - Proposals for conferences or special convenings that lead to a better understanding of issues involving the entry or re-entry of women, in particular women veterans, to STEM careers after a break will be considered for support. Conferences could explore and discuss issues such as the current knowledge base about the experience of re-entry into STEM among women in general and women veterans in particular; how women veterans navigate STEM pathways to enter or re-enter the STEM workforce; and/or the unique challenges to working in STEM fields for women who have experienced a break in their career. Conferences and convenings should be outcomes-based, and a final report should include recommendations and a statement of the impacts of the event. Awardees should plan to publish conference proceedings, and otherwise widely disseminate the discussion and outcomes. Proposals that include participation by organizations involved in the NSF INCLUDES National Network are especially encouraged.

SUBMISSION AND REVIEW

Supplemental funding requests and conference proposals must be received by 5 p.m., submitter's local time, on April 15, 2019.

  1. Traineeship Supplements

    Funds may be used for salary or stipend, travel (relocation costs), tuition and fees, health insurance, and materials and supplies to support the trainee. The grantee is permitted to request indirect costs in accordance with the negotiated rate in effect at the time of the award. If requesting support for more than one trainee, the individual requests may be combined into one supplemental funding request.

    Each supplemental funding request must include "NSF INCLUDES DCL" in the first sentence of the summary section of the request for supplemental funding along with the following components for each trainee:

    1. A two-page summary that describes the traineeship. The request must include a concise statement describing how the activities will prepare the trainee to enter or re-enter the STEM workforce.
    2. A resume of the proposed trainee (up to two pages) that contains (but not limited to) the following information:
      1. educational preparation;
      2. professional employment history; and
      3. other information relevant to the proposed traineeship.
    3. A letter from the proposed mentor describing the mentoring and training that will be provided to the trainee during the period of support.
    4. A budget and budget justification.

      The amount requested for supplemental support must be less than 20% of the original award amount, with total costs not to exceed $150,000. Funding is dependent on the availability of funds. Supplemental funding requests should be prepared and submitted in accordance with the guidance in the NSF Proposal & Award Policies & Procedures Guide (PAPPG), Chapter VI.E.4.

      Principal Investigators with current NSF INCLUDES awards or current awards in the programs listed below are eligible to apply for traineeship supplements through this DCL:

    For more information about the programs listed above, please consult with the point of contact for the program of interest denoted on the program webpage.

    Eligible Principal Investigator(s) of NSF awards should contact their cognizant Program Director(s)AND NSF INCLUDES via email at nsfincludes [at] nsf [dot] gov (nsfincludes [at] nsf [dot] gov) to discuss their request for supplemental support by March 29, 2019.

    The proposals will be reviewed internally by NSF Program Officers. All supplements are subject to (a) the availability of funds, and (b) review of the quality of the supplemental funding request.

  2. Conferences

    Conference proposals are new proposals and not requests for supplemental funding to existing NSF awards.

    Conference proposals will be funded for up to 2 years and a $250,000 maximum.

    They should be prepared and submitted in accordance with the guidance in PAPPG Chapter II.E.7, designating HRD -NSF INCLUDES (032Y) as the cognizant program.

    The "Conference" proposal type should be selected in the proposal preparation module in FastLane or Grants.gov and include "NSF INCLUDES DCL" in the title and first sentence of the project summary of the proposal.

    Conference proposals will be reviewed by a panel of external experts and are subject to the availability of funds.

    The NSF Advanced Technological Education Program (ATE) is especially interested in providing partial support for strong, innovative conference proposals submitted to NSF INCLUDES through this DCL that align with the goals of the ATE program and the tenets of this DCL.

    Interested proposers should contact NSF INCLUDES via email at nsfincludes [at] nsf [dot] gov by March 29, 2019 to discuss their conference idea.

OISE Presents Accelerating Research: International Network-to-Network Collaboration

Event date(s): Friday, October 6, 2017


Participate in an AccelNet Informational Webinar:

October 6, 2017 2:00 - 4:00 PM
https://nsf.webex.com/nsf/onstage/g.php?MTID=e29874085681c819cf77a3ceb4ca7fd41

The National Science Foundation (NSF) Office of International Science and Engineering (OISE) invites individuals or groups of individuals from the U.S. research community to submit White Papers on topics in science, engineering, and/or STEM education that are ripe for international network-to-network collaboration. Additional information on this call and instructions on submitting a White Paper are provided in the Dear Colleague Letter. Please direct questions to oise-accelnet [at] nsf [dot] gov.

OISE is hosting public webinars to discuss the Dear Colleague Letter and answer questions from the research community.

Webinar 2: Oct. 6, 2017 – 2:00pm-4:00pm Eastern Time

 Password: Accel1234! 

Audio-only participation is available via phone by dialing 1-415-655-0002 (toll) and entering audio access code: 745 044 375. Note: To view real-time captions, open a separate browser page and go to www.fedrcc.us/.  Enter the event confirmation #3389221

 If you need reasonable/accessibility accommodations to participate, contact oise-accelnet [at] nsf [dot] gov in advance of the event date for coordination.

Meeting Type
Webcast

Contacts
Suzanne Abo, (703) 292-2704, oise-accelnet [at] nsf [dot] gov
       Preferred Contact Method: Email

NSF Related Organizations
NSF-Wide
Office of International Science and Engineering

Public Attachments
Dear Colleague Letter

Related Websites
Join Webinar 2-October 6 Meeting: https://nsf.webex.com/nsf/onstage/g.php?MTID=e29874085681c819cf77a3ceb4ca7fd41

OISE Presents Accelerating Research: International Network-to-Network Collaboration

Event date(s): Thursday, September 28, 2017


Participate in an AccelNet Informational Webinar:

September 28, 2017 3:00 - 5:00 PM
https://nsf.webex.com/nsf/onstage/g.php?MTID=ed7c79d9fb70a9d9e002d84918c724951

The National Science Foundation (NSF) Office of International Science and Engineering (OISE) invites individuals or groups of individuals from the U.S. research community to submit White Papers on topics in science, engineering, and/or STEM education that are ripe for international network-to-network collaboration. Additional information on this call and instructions on submitting a White Paper are provided in the Dear Colleague Letter. Please direct questions to oise-accelnet [at] nsf [dot] gov.

OISE is hosting public webinars to discuss the Dear Colleague Letter and answer questions from the research community.

Webinar 1: Sept. 28, 2017 – 3:00pm-5:00pm Eastern Time

Password: Accel1234!

 Audio-only participation is available via phone by dialing 1-415-655-0002 (toll) and entering audio access code: 740 312 533. Note: To view real-time captions, open a separate browser page and go to http://www.fedrcc.us/.  Enter the event confirmation #3389238

Meeting Type
Webcast

Contacts
Suzanne Abo, (703) 292-2704, oise-accelnet [at] nsf [dot] gov
       Preferred Contact Method: Email

NSF Related Organizations
NSF-Wide
Office of International Science and Engineering

Public Attachments
Dear Colleague Letter

Related Websites
Join Webinar 1-September 28 Meeting: https://nsf.webex.com/nsf/onstage/g.php?MTID=ed7c79d9fb70a9d9e002d84918c724951