INCLUDES

FAQs about NSF INCLUDES DCL: Announcement of an Effort to Expand the NSF INCLUDES National Network

Wednesday, November 29, 2017

Read the NSF INCLUDES Dear Colleague Letter: Announcement of an Effort to Expand the NSF INCLUDES National Network (NSF 17-111)

 

  1. What is NSF INCLUDES?
  2. Could you elaborate on what you mean by collaborative infrastructure?
  3. What are collaborative change strategies?
  4. What is NSF INCLUDES seeking in Conference proposals submitted in response to this Dear Colleague Letter?
  5. What do you mean by link to the NSF INCLUDES Network? Does that refer to the goals of NSF INCLUDES or to specific projects?
  6. What kinds of outcomes does NSF INCLUDES expect from conferences?
  7. What does NSF INCLUDES want from successful EArly-Concept Grants for Exploratory Research (EAGER) proposals?
  8. How are NSF INCLUDES EAGERs different from other broadening participation efforts funded by NSF?
  9. How will you distinguish between an EAGER proposal and a Design and Development Launch Pilot proposal NSF 17-522? Wouldn't an EAGER grant end up being groundwork that could become a Design and Development Launch Pilot?
  10. What kinds of outcomes do you expect from EAGER projects?
  11. Would it be appropriate for an EAGER project to study existing collaborations/Networked Improvement Communities that are currently NSF funded?
  12. Can one institution submit both an EAGER and a Conference proposal related to the same topic? Can one institution submit more than one EAGER proposal?
  13. Can partnerships include institutions from outside of U.S.?
  14. Can a for-profit research firm apply for an EAGER or a Conference grant?
  15. On average, how many organizations should participate in this collaboration?
  16. If we don't have a current NSF INCLUDES Design and Development Launch Pilot project, then is an EAGER or Conference grant still possible?
  17. If we do have a current NSF INCLUDES Design and Development Launch Pilot project, can we also submit an EAGER or Conference proposal?
  18. How will EAGER and Conference proposals be reviewed?
  19. What is NSF INCLUDES looking for in requests for supplemental funding?
  20. If we have a current NSF INCLUDES Design and Development Launch Pilot project, can we also submit a Supplement request?
  21. How are NSF INCLUDES Supplements different from Design and Development Launch Pilots (NSF 17-522) or other broadening participation efforts?
  22. What kinds of outcomes does NSF INCLUDES expect from Supplements?
  23. Will there be another solicitation for Design and Development Launch Pilots in FY 2018?

Blue Divider Line

  1. What is NSF INCLUDES?

    NSF INCLUDES is one of NSF's Ten Big Ideas for Future NSF Investment meant to catalyze interest and investment in fundamental research, discovery, invention and innovation. NSF INCLUDES is catalyzing novel approaches to broadening participation in STEM by creating the NSF INCLUDES National Network, composed of NSF INCLUDES Design and Development Launch Pilots, NSF INCLUDES Alliances, NSF-funded broadening participation projects, other relevant NSF-funded projects, scholars engaged in broadening participation research, and other organizations that support the development of talent from all sectors of society to build the STEM workforce. NSF INCLUDES incentivizes the building of collaborative infrastructure that will bring people and organizations together who might currently be working in isolation.

  2. Could you elaborate on what you mean by collaborative infrastructure?

    By collaborative infrastructure we mean the structures and facilities that enable collaboration across organizations and institutions with a shared goal or vision; map out mutually reinforcing activities; develop goals, objectives and measures to map their progress; engage in constant communication; and advance the potential for expanding, scaling and sustaining the collaborative efforts that would not be possible otherwise. For the NSF INCLUDES National Network, collaborative infrastructure fosters coordination and collaboration by emphasizing the following five characteristics: Vision; Partnerships, Goals and Metrics; Leadership and Communication; and the Potential for Expansion, Sustainability and Scale. Every NSF INCLUDES project and the NSF INCLUDES National Network engage a broad community in a shared vision of the importance and power of diversity for scientific innovation. Partnerships and networks are at the heart of the NSF INCLUDES National Network, and through the Coordination Hub, Alliances, Design and Development Launch Pilots, and other network building mechanisms like this Dear Colleague Letter, NSF hopes to provide platforms for partnerships and collaborative action. Partnerships and networks will be driven by shared goals and metrics that allow for robust data that facilitate evidence-based decision making. NSF INCLUDES is also designed to build capacity for leadership and communication among organizations and individuals to create opportunities in STEM education and careers. Finally, collaborative infrastructure should lead to expansion, sustainability and scale by encouraging more partners to join the movement, thus enabling more connections and opportunities for large-scale change to occur.

  3. What are collaborative change strategies?

    Examples of collaborative change strategies include Collective Impact, Networked Improvement Communities, and Research + Practice Partnerships. Collaborative change strategies are frameworks used to tackle deeply entrenched, complex problems, like broadening participation in STEM. Such strategies are designed to make collaboration work across government, business, philanthropy, non-profit organizations and individuals to achieve significant and lasting change. Other potential frameworks are possible, and we encourage projects to explore various ways to harness the power of collaboration.

  4. What is NSF INCLUDES seeking in Conference proposals submitted in response to this Dear Colleague Letter?

    NSF INCLUDES invites Conference proposals that will link the NSF INCLUDES National Network to the knowledge base and results from the wider NSF broadening participation portfolio of programs and projects (the NSF website lists the NSF Broadening Participation portfolio programs). We are also interested in connecting the NSF INCLUDES National Network to the knowledge and experiences of NSF-funded center-scale activities, such as our Science and Technology Centers or Engineering Research Centers. Communicating the knowledge and results of other major NSF investments, and encouraging collaboration across NSF-funded efforts with the NSF INCLUDES National Network are also desirable goals of conferences. More ideas for NSF INCLUDES conferences include: facilitating a new or existing collaborative dialog among organizations that are interested in opportunities to connect with the NSF INCLUDES National Network; communicating research findings from the science of broadening participation research community to the NSF INCLUDES National Network; and/or providing a platform for new collaborations within the NSF INCLUDES National Network. Please send a one-page description of your Conference idea to NSFINCLUDES [at] nsf [dot] gov in advance of a full proposal submission so that we may discuss with you the appropriateness of your idea prior to your developing a full proposal.

  5. What do you mean by link to the NSF INCLUDES Network? Does that refer to the goals of NSF INCLUDES or to specific projects?

    Both options are acceptable. We encourage conferences that would include current NSF INCLUDES Design and Development Launch Pilot projects, but this is not a requirement. Linking to the NSF INCLUDES Network might also be facilitated through dialog about the goals of NSF INCLUDES and how participating organizations might become involved in efforts to: bring together dedicated partners; find solutions that work; and build a nation where everyone has opportunities in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

  6. What kinds of outcomes does NSF INCLUDES expect from conferences?

    The outcomes of NSF INCLUDES conferences include the engagement of individuals, organizations and groups with the concepts and ideas of the NSF INCLUDES National Network, with a view toward expanding the network. Additional outcomes of Conference grants may include (but are not limited to): presenting the findings from discussions at PI and other stakeholder meetings; a summary report from the conference gathering, including lessons learned about broadening participation and collaborative change; an edited volume in a journal, with articles based on the discussion by conference participants; and/or publication of scholarly journal articles based on conference discussions or resulting research.

  7. What does NSF INCLUDES want from successful EArly-Concept Grants for Exploratory Research (EAGER) proposals?

    In the context of this DCL, EAGERs are research projects that produce findings and results that will: generate new insights for the NSF INCLUDES National Network; suggest potential strategies for engaging NSF's existing broadening participation activities in the Network; and/or highlight lessons learned that could inform the NSF INCLUDES Launch Pilots and Alliances as they develop. EAGERs that use new theoretical approaches, methods, or data collection strategies to help foster deeper understanding of collaborative change strategies, common metrics, or how networks can expand and reach "scale" are encouraged. Studies should: be grounded in a relevant research theory or framework; apply appropriate methods; and further the evidence-based research that could illustrate the efficacy of collaborative change approaches. Appropriate goals of EAGER proposals could include developing new measures or approaches for assessing networks, or gathering preliminary data in support of theoretical approaches to understanding collaborative change. Note that these are just some ideas; NSF INCLUDES welcomes other ideas for EAGERs. EAGERs that use data science, including data analytic methodologies to understand network operations and effective expansion and management for broadening participation are especially encouraged. Please send a one-page description of your EAGER idea to NSFINCLUDES [at] nsf [dot] gov in advance of a full proposal submission so that we may discuss with you the appropriateness of your idea prior to your developing a full proposal.

  8. How are NSF INCLUDES EAGERs different from other broadening participation efforts funded by NSF?

    In the context of this DCL, EAGERs are research grants to help us understand how collaboration functions within the context of broadening participation in STEM. The focus of an EAGER is not on implementation but on theoretical research that grows the knowledge base. The NSF Broadening Participation Portfolio includes other programs that may fund interventions with a goal of broadening participation in STEM. Those interested in implementation might consult the list of Broadening Participation programs at NSF. Similarly, research proposals that could be submitted to the various Science of Broadening Participation tracks in the Directorate for Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences or the Directorate for Education and Human Resources, in response to NSF 17-143, Dear Colleague Letter: Stimulating Research Related to the Science of Broadening Participation), or through the Directorate for Engineering's Broadening Participation in Engineering program should be submitted to those programs rather than as an EAGER. EAGERs are also not evaluation studies of interventions.

  9. How will you distinguish between an EAGER proposal and a Design and Development Launch Pilot proposal NSF 17-522? Wouldn't an EAGER grant end up being groundwork that could become a Design and Development Launch Pilot?

    Design and Development Launch Pilots are projects that are taking the first steps toward building and implementing collaborative infrastructure for broadening participation in STEM. An EAGER grant is a research grant. In an EAGER proposal, we will be looking for research questions that stem from a theoretical foundation, and data collection and analysis strategies that will answer those questions. Design and Development Launch Pilot proposals as described in NSF 17-522 have very specific characteristics and requirements that are significantly different from those of a research project.

  10. What kinds of outcomes do you expect from EAGER projects?

    EAGERs should produce high-quality research suitable for publication in scholarly journals and presentations at professional conferences. EAGER projects might also culminate in a "lessons learned" document or white paper to share with the NSF INCLUDES National Network. We encourage EAGER researchers to attend PI and other stakeholder meetings to share the results of the research with the NSF INCLUDES National Network.

  11. Would it be appropriate for an EAGER project to study existing collaborations/Networked Improvement Communities that are currently NSF funded?

    An EAGER proposal involving an existing collaboration would be acceptable if it is a theoretically-driven examination of specific research questions about how collaboration functions within the specific context. The proposal should provide clear research questions and a data collection and analysis plan that would answer those questions. The outcomes should include publishable research that furthers our understanding of collaborative change strategies. EAGER projects should not be evaluations of existing efforts.

  12. Can one institution submit both an EAGER and a Conference proposal related to the same topic? Can one institution submit more than one EAGER proposal?

    There is no limit on the number of EAGER or Conference proposals that an institution may submit. We do ask that you send us a one-page description of each EAGER and/or Conference idea to NSFINCLUDES [at] nsf [dot] gov in advance of a full proposal submission so that we may discuss with you the appropriateness of your idea prior to your developing a full proposal.

  13. Can partnerships include institutions from outside of U.S.?

    Yes, partnerships may include institutions outside of the US, but keep in mind that NSF INCLUDES is about broadening participation in STEM within the US. If you want to include an international partner, you will need to justify how that partnership will help broadening participation by underrepresented groups within the US.

  14. Can a for-profit research firm apply for an EAGER or a Conference grant?

    The categories of proposers eligible to submit proposals to the National Science Foundation are identified in the NSF Proposal & Award Policies & Procedures Guide (PAPPG), Chapter I.E. US commercial organizations, especially small businesses with strong capabilities in scientific or engineering research or education, are eligible to apply for NSF grants including submission of Conference proposals. NSF INCLUDES is particularly interested in supporting projects that couple industry research, resources and perspectives with those of universities, schools, and non-profit organizations and so welcomes proposals for collaborative projects involving the private commercial sector.

  15. On average, how many organizations should participate in this collaboration?

    NSF does not stipulate the number of partnering organizations in any collaboration. Proposers are encouraged to consider the funding amount and the activities that might be achieved given that limitation and then realistically consider how many partners are feasible.

  16. If we don't have a current NSF INCLUDES Design and Development Launch Pilot project, then is an EAGER or Conference grant still possible?

    Having an NSF INCLUDES Design and Development Launch Pilot is not a prerequisite for submitting an EAGER or Conference proposal. Any organization eligible per the PAPPG may submit an EAGER or Conference proposal in response to this DCL. However, we do ask that you submit a one-page summary of your project idea to NSFINCLUDES [at] nsf [dot] gov in advance of a full proposal submission so that we may discuss with you the appropriateness of your idea prior to your developing a full proposal.

  17. If we do have a current NSF INCLUDES Design and Development Launch Pilot project, can we also submit an EAGER or Conference proposal?

    Current NSF INCLUDES Design and Development Launch Pilot grantees are eligible to submit an EAGER or Conference proposal. We do ask that you submit a one-page summary of your project idea to NSFINCLUDES [at] nsf [dot] gov in advance of a full proposal submission so that we may discuss with you the appropriateness of your idea prior to your developing a full proposal.

  18. How will EAGER and Conference proposals be reviewed?

    All NSF proposals are evaluated through two merit review criteria: the intellectual merit of a proposal is its potential to advance the knowledge base in a subject area; the broader impacts of a proposal is its potential to benefit society and contribute to the achievement of specific, desired societal outcomes. Please make sure your EAGER and/or Conference proposal addresses both the intellectual merit and the broader impacts of your idea in both the project summary and the project description. Conference proposals that come in at or over $100,000 will undergo external merit review; those under that amount may go through internal or external NSF merit review. EAGER proposals will go through the internal NSF merit review process. We highly recommend you read the sections on EAGERs and/or Conference proposals in the NSF PAPPG before writing your proposal.

  19. What is NSF INCLUDES looking for in requests for supplemental funding?

    NSF INCLUDES supplements should involve connecting an existing NSF award or a group of NSF awards to, and becoming part of, the NSF INCLUDES National Network. NSF INCLUDES will consider supplemental funding for existing NSF grants to create opportunities among NSF-funded projects with the goal of building a collaborative infrastructure for broadening participation and connection to the NSF INCLUDES National Network. Supplements may also provide seed money for experiments using collaborative change strategies for broadening participation in conjunction with the NSF INCLUDES National Network. Supplement grantees might develop linkages between an NSF-funded project and an NSF INCLUDES Design and Development Launch Pilot. Supplements may also be used to generate new ideas for bringing a community of NSF-funded projects into the NSF INCLUDES National Network. Becoming part of the NSF INCLUDES National Network is the important part of any supplement activity. We do ask that you send us a one-page description of your Supplement idea to NSFINCLUDES [at] nsf [dot] gov and discuss your idea with your cognizant program officer in advance of formally submitting a supplement request, so that we may discuss with you the appropriateness of your idea prior to your submitting a supplement request.

  20. If we have a current NSF INCLUDES Design and Development Launch Pilot project, can we also submit a Supplement request?

    Current NSF INCLUDES Design and Development Launch Pilot grantees are not eligible for Supplements.

  21. How are NSF INCLUDES Supplements different from Design and Development Launch Pilots (NSF 17-522) or other broadening participation efforts?

    Requests for supplements should describe a collaborative change strategy effort to link an existing NSF-funded activity to the NSF INCLUDES National Network and thereby become a part the NSF INCLUDES National Network. Supplements are not held to the requirements for Design and Development Launch Pilots as described in NSF 17-522 and are not considered Design and Development Launch Pilot projects. Supplements should not be used to implement a single intervention for broadening participation (e.g., offering a summer camp or an after-school program) and are not evaluation studies of interventions. In addition, NSF INCLUDES supplements are not supplements for Research Experiences for Undergraduates, or to add undergraduate or graduate assistants to your project, unless their participation is facilitating networking activities. They should also not be used to add new participants or participant groups to an existing intervention.

  22. What kinds of outcomes does NSF INCLUDES expect from Supplements?

    Supplement grantees might share data with the NSF INCLUDES National Network, present at PI or stakeholder meetings or produce a summary report of lessons learned about broadening participation and collaborative change. Other outcomes of NSF INCLUDES supplements might involve publishing scholarly journal articles about collaborative change or developing a plan or logic model for how NSF-funded projects might join the NSF INCLUDES National Network and sharing that broadly with other NSF grantees through national and disciplinary conferences. We invite other creative ideas for how to link existing NSF grantees to the NSF INCLUDES National Network through supplements. Supplement grantees are expected to participate in the NSF INCLUDES National Network by attending PI and other stakeholder meetings.

  23. Will there be another solicitation for Design and Development Launch Pilots in FY 2018?

    At this time, we do not anticipate another Design and Development Launch Pilot solicitation in FY 2018.

FAQs for NSF INCLUDES

Monday, January 9, 2017

  1. The solicitation states that an organization may serve as the lead institution on only one Design and Development Launch Pilot. Can an organization be the lead institution for more than one preliminary proposal?
  2. Is a PI permitted to submit more than one preliminary proposal?
  3. Can a 501 (c)3 non-profit organization serve as the lead institution for a Design and Development Launch Pilot? What if an organization is a school district?
  4. If an organization has not had a previous NSF Award, is it eligible to submit an NSF INCLUDES preliminary or full proposal?
  5. Are collaborative proposals accepted?
  6. How quickly will preliminary proposal be reviewed?
  7. Should a Design and Development Launch Pilot preliminary proposal be submitted to a Directorate and Division consistent with the proposal's focus and will different Directorates fund different numbers of Launch Pilots?
  8. Are Design and Development Launch Pilot preliminary proposals expected to be interdisciplinary or are discipline-specific proposals permitted?
  9. Should all preliminary proposals use a collective impact approach in order to be competitive?
  10. The solicitation states that in FY 2017, NSF will invite proposals to form NSF INCLUDES Alliances. Must one first receive a Design and Development Launch Pilot award to be eligible to compete for an NSF INCLUDES Alliance?
  11. Must the senior leaders of an organization (e.g., President, Chancellor, or Chief Executive Officer) be the PI on a preliminary proposal?
  12. Does the organization need to have an Institutional Review Board provide human subject approvals for preliminary proposals?
  13. Do Design and Development Launch Pilot proposals need to have an evaluator and an evaluation plan?
  14. Do Design and Development Launch Pilot collaborations have to include a backbone organization?
  15. When will the National Backbone Organization be established? When will an Alliance solicitation be public?

  1. The solicitation states that an organization may serve as the lead institution on only one Design and Development Launch Pilot. Can an organization be the lead institution for more than one preliminary proposal?

    No, not as a lead institution. The solicitation limits each organization to one Design and Development Launch Pilot preliminary and full proposal as the Lead Institution. However, an organization may be a collaborating partner on multiple preliminary and full proposals.

  2. Is a PI permitted to submit more than one preliminary proposal?

    Yes, but the solicitation restricts the number of preliminary and full proposals on which an individual may serve as PI; an individual may serve as a PI or Co-PI on only two (2) preliminary or full proposals.

  3. Can a 501 (c)3 non-profit organization serve as the lead institution for a Design and Development Launch Pilot? What if an organization is a school district?

    Yes, both non-profit organizations and local school districts may submit a proposal. The categories of proposers eligible to submit proposals to the National Science Foundation are described in the NSF Proposal and Awards Policy and Procedures Guide (PAPPG) Chapter 1, Part E, https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/policydocs/pappg17_1/index.jsp.

  4. If an organization has not had a previous NSF Award, is it eligible to submit an NSF INCLUDES preliminary or full proposal?

    Yes, as long as an organization is of a type listed as eligible to submit proposals in the PAPPG (https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/policydocs/pappg17_1/index.jsp), it may submit a preliminary proposal to NSF INCLUDES. Please check the NSF Prospective New Awardee Guide (https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/policydocs/pnag/pnag161.pdf), which provides specific details about Grantee Standards that all new proposing organizations must meet to be granted an NSF award. The NSF Prospective New Awardee Guide includes a list of all documents needed should an award recommendation be made.

    Any eligible organization may, after submitting a preliminary proposal that is invited, submit a full proposal to NSF 17-522.

  5. Are collaborative proposals accepted?

    Yes, but we are restricting the type of collaborative proposal to a single submission from a lead institution with collaborating institutions as subawards. Even though the Proposal and Award Policy and Procedures Guide (PAPPG) lists two types of collaborative proposals, for this competition Launch Pilot proposals submitted from multiple institutions may only be submitted via a lead institution with subawards.

  6. How quickly will preliminary proposal be reviewed?

    NSF Program Directors will make every effort to communicate the decision to Invite/Not Invite full proposals based on panel recommendations and additional portfolio considerations via FastLane in three to four weeks from the submission deadline.

  7. Should a Design and Development Launch Pilot preliminary proposal be submitted to a Directorate and Division consistent with the proposal's focus and will different Directorates fund different numbers of Launch Pilots?

    No, all preliminary proposals and full proposals should be submitted to the Division of Human Resource Development (HRD) within the Directorate for Education and Human Resources (EHR). Support for NSF INCLUDES comes from all Directorates and Offices with award decisions made at the Foundation-level based on alignment with NSF INCLUDES' vision and goals.

  8. Are Design and Development Launch Pilot preliminary proposals expected to be interdisciplinary or are discipline-specific proposals permitted?

    There is no requirement that proposals be either interdisciplinary or discipline-specific. Organizations and teams of PIs and key personnel may come together with a specific disciplinary or interdisciplinary focus, but neither is a requirement. Key to a successful proposal is the identification of specific, high-impact broadening participation in STEM goals with measurable objectives, as well as a strong argument that the set of partners being assembled includes all who are needed to successfully achieve that goal. Examples of recent awards made through the first NSF INCLUDES solicitation may be found here.

  9. Should all preliminary proposals use a collective impact approach in order to be competitive?

    No, the use of the collective impact framing and approach is not required. However, each preliminary proposal must articulate and justify the framework for collaboration, the processes for the development of a shared goal for broadening participation, and identify shared metrics and mutually reinforcing activities. Keep in mind that whatever framework is used must provide for expansion, impact and scale, and must include openness to multiple (and new) partners.

  10. The solicitation states that in FY 2017, NSF will invite proposals to form NSF INCLUDES Alliances. Must one first receive a Design and Development Launch Pilot award to be eligible to compete for an NSF INCLUDES Alliance?

    Yes, only organizations with Design and Development Launch Pilot awards may compete for NSF INCLUDES Alliances. Design and Development Launch Pilot awardees are expected to carry out and report on the results of projects to demonstrate their ability to implement a collective impact-style approach to address their selected broadening participation challenge. The project is expected to demonstrate how teams and organizations can be reconfigured and joined together to form an NSF INCLUDES Alliance with common goals and purposes, shared metrics for success, and with a strategy for how the effective practices of the Alliance can be expanded. The accomplishments of a Launch Pilot will be assessed as part of the review of the subsequent NSF INCLUDES Alliance proposal. New partners may be invited to join a Design and Development Launch Pilot that is submitting an Alliance proposal.

  11. Must the senior leaders of an organization (e.g., President, Chancellor, or Chief Executive Officer) be the PI on a preliminary proposal?

    No, the PI may be any individual eligible to be a PI at an organization or institution. NSF does encourage senior leaders to take a direct and personal role in helping to build collaborative alliances, as suggested by NSF Director France Córdova in her Dear Colleague Letter (NSF 16-048).

  12. Does the organization need to have an Institutional Review Board provide human subject approvals for preliminary proposals?

    No, IRB approvals are not needed for preliminary proposals, although they may be needed for full proposals. For guidance on IRB approvals needed for full proposals, please consult the NSF web site about the protection of human subjects (https://www.nsf.gov/bfa/dias/policy/human.jsp). Further guidance is also provided in the NSF PAPPG (https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/policydocs/pappg17_1/pappg_2.jsp#IID5).

  13. Do Design and Development Launch Pilot proposals need to have an evaluator and an evaluation plan?

    Yes, part of the Design and Development Launch Pilot activities should be to develop common goals and shared metrics for success of the launch pilot collaboration. This requires the assistance of an evaluator on the team from the beginning of the project, along with some questions for the evaluation effort to answer, as well as a plan for data collection and analysis.

  14. Do Design and Development Launch Pilot collaborations have to include a backbone organization?

    Not necessarily. While a Launch Pilot proposal may not be ready to engage a backbone or support organization, part of the process of developing a collaboration should include assessing the needs the collaboration might have for a backbone or support organization and the development of a plan to include one in a broader effort. Backbones or similar support organizations will be required for full alliances, and there will be a national backbone infrastructure that Alliances will be expected to link to; but the purpose of a Design and Development Launch Pilot is to explore the feasibility of creating collaborations that may or may not include a backbone or support organization from the outset.

  15. When will the National Backbone Organization be established? When will an Alliance solicitation be public?

    We anticipate a solicitation for a national backbone organization to support the work of the national NSF INCLUDES network to be forthcoming in calendar year 2017, followed by a solicitation for Alliances later in the year.