climate change

Podcast on Drought Features a Missouri Transect Plant Team Member

Tuesday, September 4, 2018

Missouri is currently facing a drought alert and 30 counties are experiencing extreme drought this summer.  University of Missouri Chancellor, Dr. Alexander N. Cartwright, sat down for an Inside Mizzou podcast with several MU professors, including Dr. Felix Fritschi of the Missouri Transect Plant Team to discuss how drought is understood and felt by communities, how it is studied at MU and how research can help bring about innovation to combat drought and natural disasters. 
 

Registration Open for Computer Science Institute for Women, July 2018

Wednesday, May 9, 2018

Register here: https://compsciforwomen.eventbrite.com

Questions can be directed to Terry Woodford-Thomas (tthomas [at] danforthcenter [dot] org) and Fengpeng Sun (sunf [at] umkc [dot] edu)

Paleo Perspectives on Climate Change Award Announcement

Monday, July 31, 2017

Program Solicitation

NSF 17-582

Replaces Document(s):
NSF 13-576

NSF Logo  

National Science Foundation

Directorate for Geosciences
     Division of Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences
     Division of Earth Sciences
     Division of Ocean Sciences
     Office of Polar Programs

Full Proposal Deadline(s) (due by 5 p.m. submitter's local time):

October 20, 2017

October 20, Annually Thereafter

IMPORTANT INFORMATION AND REVISION NOTES

Changes included extending deadline dates and updating PAPPG requirements.

Any proposal submitted in response to this solicitation should be submitted in accordance with the revised NSF Proposal & Award Policies & Procedures Guide (PAPPG) (NSF 17-1), which is effective for proposals submitted, or due, on or after January 30, 2017.

SUMMARY OF PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

General Information

Program Title:

Paleo Perspectives on Climate Change (P2C2)

Synopsis of Program:

The goal of research funded under the interdisciplinary P2C2 solicitation is to utilize key geological, chemical, atmospheric (gas in ice cores), and biological records of climate system variability to provide insights into the mechanisms and rate of change that characterized Earth's past climate variability, the sensitivity of Earth's climate system to changes in forcing, and the response of key components of the Earth system to these changes.

Important scientific objectives of P2C2 are to: 1) provide comprehensive paleoclimate data sets that can serve as model test data sets analogous to instrumental observations; and 2) enable transformative syntheses of paleoclimate data and modeling outcomes to understand the response of the longer-term and higher magnitude variability of the climate system that is observed in the geological and cryospheric records.

Cognizant Program Officer(s):

Please note that the following information is current at the time of publishing. See program website for any updates to the points of contact.

  • Larry C. Peterson, telephone: (703) 292-2001, email: lapeters [at] nsf [dot] gov
  • Marguerite Toscano, telephone: (703) 292-8550, email: mtoscano [at] nsf [dot] gov
  • Jonathan Wynn, telephone: (703) 292-4725, email: jwynn [at] nsf [dot] gov
  • Candace O. Major, Division of Ocean Sciences, telephone: (703) 292-7597, email: cmajor [at] nsf [dot] gov
  • William J. Wiseman, Division of Polar Programs, telephone: (703) 292-4750, email: wwiseman [at] nsf [dot] gov
  • David J. Verardo, Division of Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences, telephone: (703) 292-8527, email: dverardo [at] nsf [dot] gov

Applicable Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) Number(s):

  • 47.050 --- Geosciences

Award Information

Anticipated Type of Award:

Standard Grant or Continuing Grant

Estimated Number of Awards: 35

Approximately 35 new awards per year will be made with a typical award duration of three years.

Anticipated Funding Amount: $11,000,000

$11 million per year pending availability of funds

Eligibility Information

Who May Submit Proposals:

The categories of proposers eligible to submit proposals to the National Science Foundation are identified in the NSF Proposal & Award Policies & Procedures Guide (PAPPG), Chapter I.E.

Who May Serve as PI:

There are no restrictions or limits.

Limit on Number of Proposals per Organization:

There are no restrictions or limits.

Limit on Number of Proposals per PI or Co-PI:

There are no restrictions or limits.

Proposal Preparation and Submission Instructions

A. Proposal Preparation Instructions

  • Letters of Intent: Not required
  • Preliminary Proposal Submission: Not required
  • Full Proposals:

B. Budgetary Information

  • Cost Sharing Requirements:

    Inclusion of voluntary committed cost sharing is prohibited.

  • Indirect Cost (F&A) Limitations:

    Not Applicable

  • Other Budgetary Limitations:

    Not Applicable

C. Due Dates

  • Full Proposal Deadline(s) (due by 5 p.m. submitter's local time):

    October 20, 2017

    October 20, Annually Thereafter

Estimating Economic Damage from Climate Change in the United States

Thursday, July 6, 2017

Read the entire article here: http://science.sciencemag.org/content/356/6345/1362.full

Authors: Solomon Hsiang, Robert Kopp, Amir Jina, James Rising, Michael Delgado, Shashank Mohan, D. J. Rasmussen, Robert Muir-Wood, Paul Wilson, Michael Oppenheimer, Kate Larsen, Trevor Houser

Science  30 Jun 2017: Vol. 356, Issue 6345, pp. 1362-1369
DOI: 10.1126/science.aal4369
 

Costing out the effects of climate change

Episodes of severe weather in the United States, such as the present abundance of rainfall in California, are brandished as tangible evidence of the future costs of current climate trends. Hsiang et al. collected national data documenting the responses in six economic sectors to short-term weather fluctuations. These data were integrated with probabilistic distributions from a set of global climate models and used to estimate future costs during the remainder of this century across a range of scenarios (see the Perspective by Pizer). In terms of overall effects on gross domestic product, the authors predict negative impacts in the southern United States and positive impacts in some parts of the Pacific Northwest and New England.

Abstract

Estimates of climate change damage are central to the design of climate policies. Here, we develop a flexible architecture for computing damages that integrates climate science, econometric analyses, and process models. We use this approach to construct spatially explicit, probabilistic, and empirically derived estimates of economic damage in the United States from climate change. The combined value of market and nonmarket damage across analyzed sectors—agriculture, crime, coastal storms, energy, human mortality, and labor—increases quadratically in global mean temperature, costing roughly 1.2% of gross domestic product per +1°C on average. Importantly, risk is distributed unequally across locations, generating a large transfer of value northward and westward that increases economic inequality. By the late 21st century, the poorest third of counties are projected to experience damages between 2 and 20% of county income (90% chance) under business-as-usual emissions (Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5).

Funding Opportunity: AFRI - Agriculture and Natural Resources Science for Climate Variability and Change Challenge Area

Wednesday, July 13, 2016

Agriculture and Food Research Initiative - Agriculture and Natural Resources Science for Climate Variability and Change Challenge Area

This AFRI Challenge Area focuses on the priority to mitigate and adapt to climate variability and change. It supports activities that reduce greenhouse gas emissions, increase carbon sequestration in agricultural and forest production systems, and prepare the nation's agriculture and forests to adapt to variable climates. The long-term outcome for this program is to reduce the use of energy, nitrogen fertilizer, and water by ten percent and increase carbon sequestration by fifteen percent through resilient agriculture and forest production systems. In order to achieve this outcome, this program will support multi-function Integrated Research, Education, and/or Extension Projects and Food and Agricultural Science Enhancement (FASE) Grants.
 
 

Important Dates

Posted Date: 
Tuesday, July 12, 2016
 
Closing Date: 
Thursday, November 17, 2016
 
Other Due Date: 

Letter of Intent: The Letter of intent must be received at NIFA by 5:00 p.m. Eastern Time on September 14, 2016 Application Deadline Dates: Full Applications must be received by Grants.gov by 5:00 p.m. Eastern Time on November 17, 2016

Letter of Intent Due:

Wednesday, September 14, 2016

Additional Information

For More Information Contact: 
 
Contact for Electronic Access Problems: 

electronic [at] nifa [dot] usda [dot] gov

Confronting Climate Change Symposium on MU Campus

Thursday, March 3, 2016

Confronting Climate Change
12th Annual Life Sciences and Society Program Symposium
March 12 & 17-19, 2016
 
Monsanto Auditorium
Bond Life Sciences Center
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211
 
The Annual Life Sciences and Society Program Syposium will focus on "Confronting Climate Change."  See all the details below and on the LSSP website.   Registration for the Symposium is now open; REGISTER TODAY!  While all events are free and open to the public, registration is requested.
 
SPEAKERS

Big Challenges and Bigger Opportunities
March 12, 10:30am in Monsanto Auditorium

Richard Alley is a professor at Pennsylvania State University, an environmental scientist, PBS host, book author, and one of the contributors to the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, which won the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize.

A Journalist's Anthropocene Journey
March 17, 7:00pm in Monsanto Auditorium

Andrew Revkin is a journalist, author and educator who has been covering science and the environment, from the White House to the North Pole, for more than three decades, mainly for The New York Times.

Climate Intervention: Promise and Peril
March 18, 4:00pm in Monsanto Auditorium

Marcia McNutt is the Editor-in-chief of Science and its family of journals and is currently nominated to be the next President of the National Academy of Sciences.

Natural Systems Agriculture: New Discoveries, New Opportunities
March 19, 9:00am in Monsanto Auditorium

Wes Jackson is the founder and current president of The Land Institute, which promotes science-based research into sustainable agriculture. He is a MacArthur Fellow and winner of the Right Livelihood Award

Zombies, Sports, and Cola: Implications for Weather and Climate Communication
March 19, 10:30am in Monsanto Auditorium

Marshall Shepherd is a professor of geography and the director of the atmospheric science program at the University of Georgia and a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science’s What We Know climate panel.

The Health Consequences of a Changing Climate
March 19, 2:00pm in Monsanto Auditorium

George Luber is an epidemiologist and the Associate Director for Climate Change in the Division of Environmental Hazards and Health Effects at the National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Climate Change Denial: Where do we go from here?
March 19, 3:30pm in Monsanto Auditorium

Naomi Oreskes is a professor at Harvard University, as well as a respected essayist and author. Her 2010 book, "Merchants of Doubt: How a Handful of Scientists Obscured the Truth on Issues from Tobacco to Global Warming”, co-authored with Erik M. Conway, was shortlisted for the Los Angeles Time Book Prize.
Other Events

OTHER EVENTS

Facing Floods and Climate Change while Reforming Disaster Law
March 7, 1:00pm in Room 7, Hulston Hall, Missouri School of Law

Sandra Zellmer from the Nebraska College of Law will discuss how effective laws and policies could recognize and respond to the factors that subject people and communities to a climate-challenged world facing significant changes.

Panel Discussion on Faith and Climate Change
March 11, 12:00 - 1:30pm in Room 171 (Reading Room), Bond Life Sciences Center

The debate on climate change and environmentalism has taken on a faith-based component in recent years, with very public calls from some religious leaders to steward the earth (for example the 2015 Papal Encyclical Laudato Si: On Care for Our Common Home). Representatives of several local faiths and scholars of religious studies discuss how theology, belief, and/or faith-based practice shape perspectives on climate and environmental practice.

Film Screening: Merchants of Doubt
March 14, 5:30pm at Ragtag Cinema (followed by discussion with Mike Urban from MU Department of Geography and Sara Shipley Hiles from the Missouri School of Journalism)

Inspired by the book by Naomi Oreskes and Erik Conway, this thought-provoking documentary (directed by Robert Kenner, 2014) takes audiences on a satirically comedic and illuminating journey into the heart of climate change skepticism.

Panel Discussion on Conservation in the Anthropocene
March 16, 12:00 - 1:30pm in Adams Conference Center, MU School of Veterinary Medicine

Anthropogenic (human-caused) changes to the environment are fundamentally transforming the goals and practices of conservation. Representatives from a range of conservation agencies discuss their experiences of the challenges of working amidst shifting socioenvironmental conditions.

For more information, including full speaker bios and abstracts, visit the LSSP website.

Teacher Workshop Held in Eureka, MO

Thursday, October 1, 2015

     Dr. Troy Sadler, Professor in the MU College of Education and Director of the ReSTEM Institute, and a science education graduate student led several EPSCoR-sponsored teacher professional development workshops this summer.  In Eureka, MO, Sadler held a workshop for the Rockwood School District.  In attendance were about 55 teachers and several school administrators.  The teachers included members of the curriculum writing teams for Rockwood School District.  All of the life science teachers at Eureka High School also attended this workshop.

     The focus of the workshop was to implement issue-based teaching in secondary science classrooms as a means of supporting Next Generation Science Standards-aligned learning.  As part of the workshop program, teachers worked with the ecology learning module that was produced as a part of the Missouri Transect.  Sadler used the learning module to exemplify of how core disciplinary ideas (such as ecological interactions and interdependence) can be taught with scientific practices (such as modeling) in the context of compelling socio-scientific issues (such as climate change).

Computer Science Institute for Women workshop

Event date(s): Wednesday, July 11, 2018 to Thursday, July 12, 2018
Location: University of Missouri-Kansas City, Department of Geosciences, Flarsheim Hall, 5110 Rockhill Road, Kansas City, MO


Register here: https://compsciforwomen.eventbrite.com

Questions can be directed to Terry Woodford-Thomas (tthomas [at] danforthcenter [dot] org) and Fengpeng Sun (sunf [at] umkc [dot] edu)

Saint Louis Climate Summit

Event date(s): Sunday, April 22, 2018 to Tuesday, April 24, 2018
Location: Nine Network of Public Media, 3655 Olive Street, St. Louis, MO 63108


The 2018 Saint Louis Climate Summit brings together some of the most authoritative minds in climate science, ecology, sustainable development, and related disciplines for three days of discussion on climate change. We will highlight key issues, celebrate notable achievements, and elucidate a path forward. The Climate Summit is a featured activity of Saint Louis University’s Bicentennial Celebration.

Date: April 22-24, 2018

Location: Nine Network of Public Media, 3655 Olive Street, St. Louis, MO 63108

Register here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/saint-louis-climate-summit-tickets-36496105835

 

Full Registration & Keynote Speaker – $150.00*
Includes all meals, conference proceedings, video of conference, ticket to keynote speaker

Registration: Monday Only & Keynote Speaker – $100.00*
Registration for one full day and keynote speaker

Registration: Tuesday Only & Keynote Speaker – $100.00*
Registration for one full day and keynote speaker

 

Hosted by Saint Louis University

Funding Opportunity: AFRI - Agriculture and Natural Resources Science for Climate Variability and Change Challenge Area

Event date(s): Thursday, November 17, 2016


Agriculture and Food Research Initiative - Agriculture and Natural Resources Science for Climate Variability and Change Challenge Area

This AFRI Challenge Area focuses on the priority to mitigate and adapt to climate variability and change. It supports activities that reduce greenhouse gas emissions, increase carbon sequestration in agricultural and forest production systems, and prepare the nation's agriculture and forests to adapt to variable climates. The long-term outcome for this program is to reduce the use of energy, nitrogen fertilizer, and water by ten percent and increase carbon sequestration by fifteen percent through resilient agriculture and forest production systems. In order to achieve this outcome, this program will support multi-function Integrated Research, Education, and/or Extension Projects and Food and Agricultural Science Enhancement (FASE) Grants.
 
 

Important Dates

Posted Date: 
Tuesday, July 12, 2016
 
Closing Date: 
Thursday, November 17, 2016
 
Other Due Date: 

Letter of Intent: The Letter of intent must be received at NIFA by 5:00 p.m. Eastern Time on September 14, 2016 Application Deadline Dates: Full Applications must be received by Grants.gov by 5:00 p.m. Eastern Time on November 17, 2016

Letter of Intent Due:

Wednesday, September 14, 2016

Additional Information

For More Information Contact: 
 
Contact for Electronic Access Problems: 

electronic [at] nifa [dot] usda [dot] gov

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