application

National Science Foundation Research Traineeship (NRT) Program FAQs

Wednesday, November 8, 2017

PROGRAM SOLICITATION: NSF 18-507

Letter of Intent Due Date(s) (required) (due by 5 p.m. submitter's local time):

     November 27, 2017 - December 06, 2017

     November 26, 2018 - December 06, 2018

     November 25, 2019 - December 06, 2019

Full Proposal Deadline(s) (due by 5 p.m. submitter's local time):

     February 06, 2018

     February 06, 2019

     February 06, 2020

General Information

Program Title:

National Science Foundation Research Traineeship (NRT) Program

Synopsis of Program:

The NSF Research Traineeship (NRT) program is designed to encourage the development and implementation of bold, new, and potentially transformative models for STEM graduate education training. The NRT program seeks proposals that explore ways for graduate students in research-based master’s and doctoral degree programs to develop the skills, knowledge, and competencies needed to pursue a range of STEM careers.

The program is dedicated to effective training of STEM graduate students in high priority interdisciplinary research areas, through the use of a comprehensive traineeship model that is innovative, evidence-based, and aligned with changing workforce and research needs. For FY2018, proposals are requested in any interdisciplinary research theme of national priority, with special emphasis on two high priority areas: (1) Harnessing the Data Revolution (HDR) and (2) Innovations at the Nexus of Food, Energy, and Water Systems (INFEWS). HDR is expected to continue as a priority research area for FY2019 and FY2020 competitions, along with a new priority area to be announced in 2018.

The NRT program addresses workforce development, emphasizing broad participation, and institutional capacity building needs in graduate education. Strategic collaborations with the private sector, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), government agencies, national laboratories, field stations, teaching and learning centers, informal science centers, and academic partners are encouraged. NRT especially welcomes proposals that will pair well with the efforts of NSF INCLUDES to develop STEM talent from all sectors and groups in our society (https://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/nsfincludes/index.jsp). Collaborations are encouraged between NRT proposals and existing NSF INCLUDES projects, provided the collaboration strengthens both projects.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) for NRT Program

  1. What is an NRT trainee?
  2. What is an NRT traineeship?
  3. Can international students be NRT trainees?
  4. If I forgot to submit a letter of intent during the submission window, can I get a waiver to submit a full proposal in February.
  5. Is there greater funding available for the priority research areas identified in the solicitation?
  6. Can we propose research that addresses more than one priority area?
  7. If master's and doctoral students are included in one NRT project, how much overlap in their training is expected and/or preferred?
  8. Does the mention of pedagogy and mentoring training for faculty members mean that the NRT will fund professional development for faculty?
  9. Can a project propose funding for the improvement of a training model that is not entirely new but is certainly not (yet) broadly adopted?
  10. Does the fact that "Education" is not included in the "NRT" title mean that NRT will fund more proposed hands-on training and less classroom instruction?
  11. Referring to the "Key features of NRT Projects" (Section II.C of the solicitation), are we being asked to develop evidence-based strategies to broaden participation of students from diverse backgrounds, or are we being asked to apply evidence-based strategies that are already in practice?
  12. Are there preferred types of formative assessments (Section II.C of the solicitation) that we would include as central to the traineeship, or are these formative assessments open as part of the new model we are proposing?
  13. Is there a limit on cost of education that can be charged to the grant?
  14. Will NRT proposals with only external evaluators receive more preference than proposals that include internal evaluators?
  15. Can I propose an NRT project for a non-research-based Professional Master's program?
  16. Does the limit on the number of submissions per organization apply to subawardees and non-lead organizations on collaborative proposals?
  17. Can NRT projects include international partners?
  18. Will we need Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval of the evaluation activities and instruments described in our proposal?
  19. Will a project that focuses on a master's only program receive lower preference than projects involving doctoral students only or both doctoral and master's students?
  20. Will proposals that do not meet the eligibility requirements for submission be returned without review?
  21. Is there a list of national priority interdisciplinary research themes?
  22. Can a project focus on a research theme other than those identified in the high priority areas?

 

  1. What is an NRT trainee?

    An NRT "trainee" is a research-based STEM graduate student (M.S. or Ph.D.) who is accepted into the institution's NRT program and is expected to complete all the required program elements as described in the proposal. NRT trainees can be NRT-funded or non-NRT-funded; they do not have to receive stipend and tuition support directly from the NRT award. They can be supported from a variety of sources including research assistantships, teaching assistantships, fellowships, scholarships, or other funding.

  2. What is an NRT traineeship?

    An NRT traineeship is focused on students and their technical and broader professional development. In the case of NRT, a traineeship involves a strong institutional commitment to mentoring STEM graduate students and the development of their technical and transferable professional skills (e.g., teamwork, ethics, communications, teaching, leadership, and project management) for a variety of STEM careers within or outside academia. NRT includes a focus on the students' overall development as STEM professionals, in addition to their conducting cutting-edge interdisciplinary research.

  3. Can international students be NRT trainees?

    Yes, they can be NRT trainees and fully participate in any NRT program elements (e.g., courses, workshops, and internships). However, NRT stipends and customary costs of education for stipend-supported trainees are restricted to U.S. citizens, nationals, and permanent residents.

  4. If I forgot to submit a letter of intent during the submission window, can I get a waiver to submit a full proposal in February.

    No, a valid letter of intent MUST be submitted by the deadline to be eligible for full proposal submission. There is approximately a 2-week submission window for each annual competition. The PI prepares the letter but the official submission (via the AOR) must be completed before the deadline. A letter from a prior award cycle is not valid.

  5. Is there greater funding available for the priority research areas identified in the solicitation?

    No, there is no set allocation for a priority area. Funding is anticipated to be allocated in each area, including proposals submitted outside the identified priority areas.

  6. Can we propose research that addresses more than one priority area?

    Although NRT proposals may include research and training efforts that contribute to more than one priority area, each project should identify a main area (e.g. HDR, INFEWS or other) by using the appropriate title prefix. The research area should be identified in the Project Title at the time of submission using the appropriate prefix (e.g. "NRT-HDR:" or "NRT-INFEWS:" or "NRT:" for other research areas).

  7. If master's and doctoral students are included in one NRT project, how much overlap in their training is expected and/or preferred?

    The training approach is left up to the proposer to develop. Potentially, training in specific methodologies could be suitable for both master's and doctoral students together. However, some training might be better suited for master's or doctoral students separately.

  8. Does the mention of pedagogy and mentoring training for faculty members mean that the NRT will fund professional development for faculty?

    An NRT proposal may include funding for faculty training.

  9. Can a project propose funding for the improvement of a training model that is not entirely new but is certainly not (yet) broadly adopted?

    An NRT proposal may include funding to expand or improve a current training model, but the potential added value should be substantial and potentially transformative.

  10. Does the fact that "Education" is not included in the "NRT" title mean that NRT will fund more proposed hands-on training and less classroom instruction?

    No, training may include classroom instruction.

  11. Referring to the "Key features of NRT Projects" (Section II.C of the solicitation), are we being asked to develop evidence-based strategies to broaden participation of students from diverse backgrounds, or are we being asked to apply evidence-based strategies that are already in practice?

    Proposers are encouraged to build upon existing evidence-based strategies for broadening participation of students from diverse backgrounds, although they may also incorporate and test strategies that show promise of success based on available information.

  12. Are there preferred types of formative assessments (Section II.C of the solicitation) that we would include as central to the traineeship, or are these formative assessments open as part of the new model we are proposing?

    It is up to the proposers to identify the types of formative assessments. However, they should be formulated and designed to regularly inform and improve the NRT project.

  13. Is there a limit on cost of education that can be charged to the grant?

    The institution can budget for customary costs of education (e.g. tuition, health insurance, and required fees) for NRT trainees while they are receiving NRT stipend support. You may offer a discounted tuition rate if this is a customary practice for federally-funded trainees, research assistants, and/or fellows at your institution and not a practice solely for the NRT trainees.

  14. Will NRT proposals with only external evaluators receive more preference than proposals that include internal evaluators?

    All proposals must have an external evaluator. If an internal evaluator is also engaged, the project must provide justification and explain how lack of bias is ensured, including at minimum a provision for periodic external assessment of the ongoing evaluation by the external evaluator.

  15. Can I propose an NRT project for a non-research-based Professional Master's program?

    No, research is integral to the NRT program. For NRT proposals, non-research-based professional master's students are eligible to participate in NRT activities; however, they cannot be considered "trainees" (See FAQ #1 for a definition of "trainee") by the program and are ineligible to receive NRT stipend or cost of education support. NRT trainees must be in a research-based degree program that requires a thesis or dissertation.

  16. Does the limit on the number of submissions per organization apply to subawardees and non-lead organizations on collaborative proposals?

    Yes, eligible organizations may participate in only two proposals per competition. Participation includes serving as a lead organization on a non-collaborative proposal or as a lead organization, non-lead organization, or subawardee on a collaborative proposal. However, this limitation does not apply to organizations participating solely as evaluators on projects.

  17. Can NRT projects include international partners?

    Yes, NRT projects may include international partners if they provide significant added value to the projects. However, international partners cannot be subawardees and funds for their participation must be drawn from non-NSF sources.

  18. Will we need Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval of the evaluation activities and instruments described in our proposal?

    If your proposal is successful and awarded, you will need to provide official documentation from your institutions IRB confirming either that the planned activities involving human subjects have been approved or that your project falls into an exemption category.

  19. Will a project that focuses on a master's only program receive lower preference than projects involving doctoral students only or both doctoral and master's students?

    No, all proposals will be evaluated based on their merit. Projects involving master's students, Ph.D. students, and both master's and Ph.D. students will be evaluated equally.

  20. Will proposals that do not meet the eligibility requirements for submission be returned without review?

    Yes, proposals that do not comply with the solicitation will be returned without review. The eligibility conditions (Section IV of the solicitation) include who may submit proposals and serve as a PI, limits on the number of proposals per organization, and limits to number of proposals per PI or Co-PI. In cases where proposals are submitted that exceed eligibility limits, submissions will be accepted (beginning with the earliest submission time stamp) until the limit is reached. All submissions beyond the eligibility limits (based on submission time stamp) will be returned without review.

  21. Is there a list of national priority interdisciplinary research themes?

    No, there is not a set list of research themes. Instead, submissions that are not in one of the identified priority areas should justify that the interdisciplinary research theme is an area of high national need.

  22. Can a project focus on a research theme other than those identified in the high priority areas?

    Yes, traineeships may focus on any area of interdisciplinary research that is of high national priority. The project team should justify in the proposal why the identified area is of national importance and how a traineeship program would fulfill an unmet need.

USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture Funding Opportunities

Friday, April 21, 2017

Agriculture and Food Research Initiative - Sustainable Bioenergy and Bioproducts Challenge Area

Request for Applications
Apply for Grant

Deadline Date: Wednesday, June 28, 2017

Agriculture and Food Research Initiative - Resilient Agroecosystems in a Changing Climate

Request for Applications
Apply for Grant

Deadline Date: Thursday, July 13, 2017

NSF - NIFA Plant Biotic Interactions Program

Request for Applications
Apply for Grant

Deadline Date: Friday, September 1, 2017

Agriculture and Food Research Initiative - Food, Agriculture, Natural Resources and Human Sciences Education and Literacy Initiative

Request for Applications
Apply for Grant

Predoctoral Fellowships: Wednesday, June 21, 2017
Postdoctoral Fellowships: Wednesday, June 21, 2017
Professional Development for Secondary School Teachers and Educational Professionals: Wednesday, June 28, 2017
Research and Extension Experiences for Undergraduates: Wednesday, June 28, 2017

Dear Colleague Letters on NSF Graduate Student Opportunities

Monday, January 9, 2017

NSF released two Dear Colleague Letters regarding graduate student opportunities in Chemistry and Math:

Dear Colleague Letter: Improving Graduate Student Preparedness for the Chemistry Workforce (NSF 17-045)

NSF has identified as one of its Agency Priority Goals an effort to improve graduate student preparedness for entering the workforce (http://www.performance.gov/node/40262?view=public#apg). As part of this effort, the Division of Chemistry (CHE) supports masters and doctoral students so that they can acquire the knowledge, experience, and skills needed for highly productive careers, inside and outside of academe. This Dear Colleague Letter describes opportunities for supplemental funding to enhance the training experience of graduate students currently supported by active CHE research grants.

Dear Colleague Letter: NSF Mathematical Sciences Graduate Internship (NSF 17-042)

The National Science Foundation (NSF) Division of Mathematical Sciences (DMS) aims to provide opportunities to enrich the training of graduate doctoral students in the Mathematical Sciences through the provision of a NSF DMS funded summer research internship program. Towards this objective, DMS has partnered with the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) which is managed by Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) for the Department of Energy, to establish the NSF Mathematical Sciences Graduate Internship program.

The immediate goal of the program is to fund approximately twenty internships, primarily at the National Laboratories. The longer-term goals are to expand the program and to include private industries and nonprofit organizations as hosts. The program is intended to introduce doctoral students in mathematics to interesting applications of mathematical or statistical theories outside of academia. The internships are aimed at students who are interested in understanding the application of advanced mathematical and statistical techniques to "real world" problems, regardless of whether they plan to pursue an academic or nonacademic career.

Critical Techniques, Technologies and Methodologies for Advancing Foundations and Applications of Big Data Sciences and Engineering (BIGDATA)

Friday, January 6, 2017

Program Solicitation

NSF 17-534

Submission Window Date(s) (due by 5 p.m. submitter's local time):

March 15, 2017 - March 22, 2017

Synopsis of Program

The BIGDATA program seeks novel approaches in computer science, statistics, computational science, and mathematics, along with innovative applications in domain science, including social and behavioral sciences, education, biology, the physical sciences, and engineering that lead towards the further development of the interdisciplinary field of data science.

The solicitation invites two categories of proposals:

  • Foundations (F): those developing or studying fundamental theories, techniques, methodologies, and technologies of broad applicability to big data problems, motivated by specific data challenges and requirements; and
  • Innovative Applications (IA): those engaged in translational activities that employ new big data techniques, methodologies, and technologies to address and solve problems in specific application domains. Projects in this category must be collaborative, involving researchers from domain disciplines and one or more methodological disciplines, e.g., computer science, statistics, mathematics, simulation and modeling, etc.

Proposals in both categories must include a clear description of the big data aspect(s) that have motivated the proposed approach(es), for example: the scalability of methods with increasing data volumes, rates, heterogeneity; or data quality and data bias; etc. Innovative Applications proposals must provide clear examples of the impacts of the big data techniques, technologies and/or methodologies on (a) specific domain application(s).

Proposals in all areas of sciences and engineering covered by participating NSF directorates and partnering agencies [the Office of Financial Research (OFR)], are welcome.

Award Information

Anticipated Type of Award: Standard Grant or Continuing Grant or Cooperative Agreement

Estimated Number of Awards: 27 to 35

About 27-35 projects will be funded, subject to availability of funds.

Anticipated Funding Amount: $26,500,000

Up to $26,500,000 will be invested by NSF and the Office of Financial Research (OFR), in proposals submitted to this solicitation, subject to the availability of funds. Up to $9,000,000 will be invested by Amazon Web Services (AWS), Google, and Microsoft (up to $3,000,000 each) in the form of cloud credits/resources.

Projects will typically receive NSF funding in the range of $200,000 to a maximum of $500,000 per year, for 3 to 4 years of support. The minimum award size will be $600,000 of total NSF/OFR funding, reflecting the minimum expected level of effort for BIGDATA projects, which are expected to be multidisciplinary in nature and include significant student involvement. Any allocation of cloud credits/resources from AWS, Google or Microsoft will be in addition to the NSF/OFR funding.

Eligibility Information

Who May Submit Proposals:

The categories of proposers eligible to submit proposals to the National Science Foundation are identified in the Grant Proposal Guide, Chapter I, Section E.

Who May Serve as PI:

There are no restrictions or limits.

Limit on Number of Proposals per Organization:

There are no restrictions or limits.

Limit on Number of Proposals per PI or Co-PI: 1

An individual may participate as PI, co-PI, Senior Personnel, consultant, or any other role in no more than one proposal, or related subaward, submitted in response to this solicitation.

In the event that an individual exceeds this limit, any proposal submitted to this solicitation with this individual listed as a PI, co-PI, senior personnel, consultant or any other role after the first proposal is received at NSF will be returned without review. No exceptions will be made.

Proposals submitted in response to this solicitation may not duplicate or be substantially similar to other proposals concurrently under consideration by NSF.

Proposal Preparation and Submission Instructions

A. Proposal Preparation Instructions:

  • Letters of Intent: Not required
  • Preliminary Proposal Submission: Not required
  • Full Proposals:

    • Full Proposals submitted via FastLane: NSF Proposal and Award Policies and Procedures Guide, Part I: Grant Proposal Guide (GPG) Guidelines apply. The complete text of the GPG is available electronically on the NSF website at: https://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=gpg.
    • Full Proposals submitted via Grants.gov: NSF Grants.gov Application Guide: A Guide for the Preparation and Submission of NSF Applications via Grants.gov Guidelines apply (Note: The NSF Grants.gov Application Guide is available on the Grants.gov website and on the NSF website at: https://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=grantsgovguide)

B. Budgetary Information

  • Cost Sharing Requirements:

    Inclusion of voluntary committed cost sharing is prohibited.

  • Indirect Cost (F&A) Limitations:

    Not Applicable

  • Other Budgetary Limitations:

    Not Applicable

C. Due Dates

  • Submission Window Date(s) (due by 5 p.m. submitter's local time):

         March 15, 2017 - March 22, 2017

IMPORTANT INFORMATION AND REVISION NOTES

Amazon Web Services (AWS), Google, and Microsoft are now participating in the solicitation by providing cloud credits/resources to qualifying projects. The solicitation provides details regarding the participation of these companies, and the use of their cloud resources.

NSF Powerpoints from the Missouri Transect Annual Meeting

Friday, September 16, 2016

 

 

Missouri EPSCoR Track-1 Program, Missouri Transect, held its second Annual Meeting on the Missouri University of Science & Technology (MST) campus in Rolla on September 14-15, 2016.  Dr. Rebecca Kruse attended the proceedings on September 14 to give presentations on NSF funding opportunities for junior faculty, postdoctoral fellows, and graduate students.

Rebecca Kruse Bio

Dr. Rebecca Kruse is a Program Director for the Division of Research on Learning in Formal & Informal Settings (in Educational and Human Resources). Rebecca currently serves the Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST), Discovery Research PreK-12 (DRK-12), STEM+Computing Partnerships (STEM+C), and Promoting Research & Innovation in Methodologies for Evaluation (PRIME) programs. Rebecca also manages NSF’s participation in the interagency Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program and supports EHR’s program evaluation and monitoring activities. Rebecca’s prior work included development, research, and evaluation of projects and programs that support STEM education across age groups, learning settings, and community contexts. Rebecca has contributed to numerous projects funded by the Department of Defense, the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Education, the National Institutes of Health, and the state of Louisiana. Rebecca holds a Ph.D. in Chemistry from University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign and conducted post-doctoral work in science education at San Diego State University’s Center for Research in Mathematics and Science Education. Recent positions include Evaluation Director for the Army Educational Outreach Program Cooperative Agreement (led by Virginia Tech) and Science Educator at Biological Sciences Curriculum Study.

NSF Presentations given on September 14, 2016 at the Missouri Transect Annual Meeting in Rolla, MO

National Science Foundation Funding Opportunities Presentation given on September 15, 2016 at the University of Missouri-Columbia

 

Blue Waters Graduate Fellowships Accepting Applications

Tuesday, December 1, 2015

Applications are due Feb. 3, 2016 for the Blue Waters Graduate Fellowship program, which provides graduate students from across the country the opportunity to immerse themselves in a year of focused high-performance computing (HPC) research. Fellows will receive a stipend of $38,000, up to a $12,000 tuition allowance, and up to 50,000 node-hours on the petascale Blue Waters supercomputer to support their research.

The fellowship is designed to support PhD students who are engaged in a program of study and research that is directly relevant to the use of Blue Waters. Preference will be given to candidates engaged in a multidisciplinary research project that combines disciplines such as computer science, applied mathematics and computational science applications.

Researchers across the country are using Blue Waters to gain new understanding of how viruses attack our bodies, the formation of galaxies and of severe storms, space weather, sub-atomic physics, and other challenging topics. Blue Waters is designed to handle the most compute-intensive, memory-intensive, and data-intensive challenges in computational science and engineering. Blue Waters features:

  • Nearly 27,000 very high-performance computational nodes including more than 4,000 GPUs
  • More than 1.66 petabytes of memory
  • More than 25 usable petabytes of online disk storage
  • Up to 500 petabytes of nearline tape storage

For complete details of the Blue Waters system, visit bluewaters.ncsa.illinois.edu/hardware-summary.

Fellowship applicants must be a U.S. citizen or a permanent resident of the U.S. by the time of the application deadline. Applications will be evaluated based on:

  • Academic record from undergraduate and graduate work
  • Research plan and its relationship to use of the Blue Waters supercomputer
  • GRE scores
  • Related experience and service
  • Letters of reference

Applications, including all supporting materials except reference letters, must be submitted no later than midnight PST on Feb. 3. Reference letters are due by midnight PST on Feb. 10. Awards will be announced in spring 2016, with the tuition allowance applied to the 2016-2017 academic year.

For complete information on the fellowships, visit bluewaters.ncsa.illinois.edu/fellowships. Questions? Contact bwgf [at] ncsa [dot] illinois [dot] edu.

National Science Foundation Research Traineeship (NRT) Program

Event date(s): Monday, November 27, 2017 to Wednesday, December 6, 2017


PROGRAM SOLICITATION: NSF 18-507

Due Dates

Letter of Intent Due Date(s) (required) (due by 5 p.m. submitter's local time):

     November 27, 2017 - December 06, 2017

Full Proposal Deadline(s) (due by 5 p.m. submitter's local time):

     February 06, 2018

General Information

Program Title:

National Science Foundation Research Traineeship (NRT) Program

Synopsis of Program:

The NSF Research Traineeship (NRT) program is designed to encourage the development and implementation of bold, new, and potentially transformative models for STEM graduate education training. The NRT program seeks proposals that explore ways for graduate students in research-based master’s and doctoral degree programs to develop the skills, knowledge, and competencies needed to pursue a range of STEM careers.

The program is dedicated to effective training of STEM graduate students in high priority interdisciplinary research areas, through the use of a comprehensive traineeship model that is innovative, evidence-based, and aligned with changing workforce and research needs. For FY2018, proposals are requested in any interdisciplinary research theme of national priority, with special emphasis on two high priority areas: (1) Harnessing the Data Revolution (HDR) and (2) Innovations at the Nexus of Food, Energy, and Water Systems (INFEWS). HDR is expected to continue as a priority research area for FY2019 and FY2020 competitions, along with a new priority area to be announced in 2018.

The NRT program addresses workforce development, emphasizing broad participation, and institutional capacity building needs in graduate education. Strategic collaborations with the private sector, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), government agencies, national laboratories, field stations, teaching and learning centers, informal science centers, and academic partners are encouraged. NRT especially welcomes proposals that will pair well with the efforts of NSF INCLUDES to develop STEM talent from all sectors and groups in our society (https://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/nsfincludes/index.jsp). Collaborations are encouraged between NRT proposals and existing NSF INCLUDES projects, provided the collaboration strengthens both projects.

Award Information

Anticipated Type of Award: Standard Grant

Estimated Number of Awards: 10 to 12

The estimated number of awards listed above is for FY2018. The number of awards and funding level in FY2019 and FY2020 are anticipated to be similar to FY2018. Funding amounts depend upon availability of funds.

Anticipated Funding Amount: $36,100,000

NRT Awards (10-12 anticipated in FY2018) are expected to be up to five (5) years in duration with a total budget up to $3,000,000.

Eligibility Information

Who May Submit Proposals:

Proposals may only be submitted by the following:

  • Universities and colleges accredited in, and having a campus located in, the U.S. acting on behalf of their faculty members and that award a research-based master’s degree and/or a doctoral degree in a STEM discipline supported by the National Science Foundation.

Who May Serve as PI:

The PI must be on the faculty of the submitting institution.

Limit on Number of Proposals per Organization: 2

An eligible organization may participate in two proposals per competition. Participation includes serving as a lead organization, non-lead organization, or subawardee on any proposal. Organizations participating solely as evaluators on projects are excluded from this limitation. Proposals that exceed the institutional eligibility limit (beyond the first two submissions based on timestamp) will be returned without review regardless of the institution’s role (lead organization, non-lead collaborative, or subawardee) in the returned proposal.

Limit on Number of Proposals per PI or Co-PI: 1

An individual may serve as Lead Principal Investigator (PI) or Co-PI on only one proposal submitted to the NRT program per annual competition. Proposals that exceed the PI/Co-PI eligibility limit (beyond the first submission based on timestamp), will be returned without review regardless of the individual's role (PI or co-PI) in the returned proposal.

Proposal Preparation and Submission Instructions

A. Proposal Preparation Instructions

  • Letters of Intent: Submission of Letters of Intent is required. Please see the full text of this solicitation for further information.

  • Preliminary Proposal Submission: Not required
  • Full Proposals:

B. Budgetary Information

  • Cost Sharing Requirements:

    Inclusion of voluntary committed cost sharing is prohibited.

  • Indirect Cost (F&A) Limitations:

    Not Applicable

  • Other Budgetary Limitations:

    Not Applicable

C. Due Dates

  • Letter of Intent Due Date(s) (required) (due by 5 p.m. submitter's local time):

         November 27, 2017 - December 06, 2017

         November 26, 2018 - December 06, 2018

         November 25, 2019 - December 06, 2019

  • Full Proposal Deadline(s) (due by 5 p.m. submitter's local time):

         February 06, 2018

         February 06, 2019

         February 06, 2020